Declawing against the LAW

Tik cat's mum

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I can accept cropping the tail on certain breeds of dogs where it has been a tradition but only on certain conditions.

It was done, originally, on certain breeds of hunting dogs so that their tails wouldn't flag and scare off game.
It was also done on dogs that ran through brush so that their tails wouldn't get caught up in briars. The same goes for cropping ears.

Legend also has it that, in olden times, poachers would crop dogs tails to prevent game wardens from seeing the dogs and killing them.
In those days, anybody but the king or his nobles who hunted was considered a poacher. People had to eat and, often, game was one of the few sources of meat. Farmers wouldn't want to butcher their cows because that's where they got milk. Sometimes, hunting was the only way to feed a family.

At least, this is what I was told, long ago. Take it for what it's worth and leave the rest.

I'm not in favor of it, per se, but, in the breeds where it's traditional AND if the dog is going to hunt, I would accept it even though I prefer not. If the dog is not going to hunt, I'm NOT in favor.

Declawing a cat? There is no tradition of it, even if those reasons are only legend.

Back in the olden days, if you had a cat, you wanted it to have claws. Most people kept cats to catch mice. How can a cat do its job without claws?

Just to reiterate... There can be reasons to dock a dog, even if they are only historical. Personally, I don't care for it but if you want to stick to tradition, I'll give.

There is noting in history that justifies declawing a cat.
Yes I certainly know why dog's tails where docked and ears and dew claws clipped. But for me I found that most people just liked the look, in the 90s I had 2 rotties both had tails and dew claws removed even though it was frowned upon at that time. Not by me but the breeder, I used to feel the same it was done for reasons, traditions. Unfortunately I found out through breeder's of the breed the problem's this caused mostly by back yard breeders who had no idea what they where doing. Pup's lost through infection, bands not being placed at the right point on the tail, the dog would have a wound that just didn't heal and need vet treatment to put it right. This made me research about it and find out dog's comumicate with there tails. When my male was used for stud it was done on the condition that the pup's would be left intact with tails. I still think some beeds of dog's look better docked but because of what I know now would not purchase another dog that's been done.
 
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Caspers Human

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...the problem's this caused mostly by back yard breeders who had no idea what they where doing.
Na-na-na...NO! If you're going to perform surgery call a vet! That's what vets are for!

When I was a kid, my father called a vet. The guy came over and did all the puppies in a clean spot in the basement.

I would never even think of doing something like that myself. Not even if I'd seen it done 1,000 times!
 

Caspers Human

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IF a dog is docked it should be according to breed standard, show dog or not.
If somebody isn't going to take the time to have it done the way it "should" be done then they shouldn't do it.

If you're going to go through all the effort of showing a dog or training it for hunting, why are you doing things half-a$$ed?
You put good money into that dog. Doing anything but the the "proper" way is throwing good money after bad.

There isn't a place in my life for hunting, anymore, and I can't imagine a time when there will be, again. I don't have any reason to get a hunting dog but, if I did, it wouldn't be for hunting. Although I've been to dog shows and field trials, I don't have any desire to show a dog like that. I would have no reason to dock such a dog if, indeed, I would ever have one but, if I did, I would do everything by the book, so to speak.

I STILL don't recommend it unless ALL the above conditions are met but if somebody has a dog and they want to dock it just because they think that's what they are "supposed" to do then they should STILL have it done by a reputable vet who knows how to do it right.

As the saying goes, "If you don't want take the time to do something right then don't do it at all."

We're talking about cats, here, so I want to make it clear that, with dogs, there MIGHT be some reasons to do these thing with a dog under the right circumstances and if it is done properly but there isn't any reason, tradition or not, to have a cat declawed. If somebody tries to make an excuse like, "If they do things like that to dogs, why not a cat?" my answer would be "Bull$#!"

Let's extend the logic of that saying, "If you aren't going to take care of your cat the right way then don't have a cat at all."
 

catapault

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Not just our house cats. I saw an article on the BBC today. An 18 month old pet lion was seized in Cambodia. Pet lion confiscated in Cambodia after TikTok videos

"In addition, the lion's canine teeth had been removed, along with its claws, which drastically reduces a lion's quality of life," it said.

Just vile.

Also, about docking a dog's tail - many years ago we had a lab x weimaraner. Happy tail wagging, clear a coffee table in no time. Somehow she damaged the end of her tail. Circulation is poor out there. Antibiotics, bandages, etc. Changing bandage one day and there was the smell of rotting meat. Gangrene. Took her to the vet and told him that while I didn't approve of docking clearly this had to be done. Now this was serious surgery because Sheba was an adult dog. Because it did have to be done, I asked that he do her like a German shorthair pointer.

So in the end what we had was a black as coal hound, with those long legs, hound tucked up tummy, floppy ears - and a short tail. People admired her, didn't recognize the breed - what was she? they'd ask. Weimador, I'd answer. Sounded better than labaramer.
 
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Barbcbrose

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What is my alternative?
To accept the kitten with its claws as is... teach him to scratch the pole or you can put foam and covers on the furniture. I feel that if we are going to have a kitty and cat we have to accept them with their claws, otherwise why have them? They feel as much as we do... or get a trainer to help teach you... do you love your cat? do you want the best for your cat or for you? or both?
 

Bubblesmom2014

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Well I do love my cat and I have tried to train her to scratch other items and not the walls of my house. I believe this will teach her to stop. I don’t know who can afford to pay someone to train a cat. That’s why I chose this alternative. For me it’s the next best thing. I’m sorry if this offends you.
 
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Barbcbrose

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What is my alternative?
by the way, I had a cat once, her name was also "Athena" she was given to me already declawed, she was so very unhappy. I realize you are trying to do your best. Is there a trainer you can get so it wont scratch your walls, also I do believe in animal comunicators, perhaps you can find one to help... here is a link to one. they can help understand what the behaviour is about it and how to help change it... this may help... Contact - Lynn McKenzie
 

Bubblesmom2014

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I don’t think having these put on her is going to traumatize her too much. Hopefully using them once or twice will teach her to stop clawing my walls. I’m just very happy that she doesn’t claw my future.
 
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