Cutting Dog Nails

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Animals' started by sabrinah, Apr 14, 2018.

  1. 1 bruce 1

    1 bruce 1 TCS Member Super Cat

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    I think they look great, but if you're wanting to work for shorter I say go for it!
    Some dogs literally go "up on their toes" when they're happy/prancing all over the place, and since he's a silent stealth but a tappy-prancer, I wonder if he doesn't naturally raise up onto those toes more when he's animated/etc., leading to that clicking sound.
    Seriously I know people who can't get nails looking like that with a dremel and the fact you did it with the clippers impresses me.
     
  2. sabrinah

    sabrinah Thread Starter TCS Member Alpha Cat

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    No matter what he does (unless he's being sneaky) he clicks. Walking to the water bowl, following people around the kitchen, leaving the kitchen because he got yelled at for almost killing someone, going to the bathroom, etc. Constant clicking! It's not even quieter right after a trim! Maybe he just walks on his tippy toes more than other dogs? I hope the way he walks won't mess up his feet in the long run. He is a totally disproportionate dog so I wouldn't be surprised if he held himself a little differently. His chest is bald because it rubs on stuff so much! It's too big for his little legs. I know there's a point of nails being too short and I'm kinda scared I'll end up there in my quest for a silent walker. Ok, maybe not silent, just quieter. Muted taps instead of full-on tap dancing at full volume.

    I feel better about my nail cutting skills after hearing that! He doesn't particularly love it and he tries to kick me in the face when I do his back feet. I end up having to pin one back foot under my arm while I do the other. He doesn't mind getting them filed to round it all out afterward thankfully.
     
  3. nansiludie

    nansiludie TCS Member Top Cat

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    All my dogs have always had clicking nails when walking across hard flooring. I never knew that you could not have that sound with dogs. The only reason the cats don't is because of their retracting claws. Your dog's nails are very short. I've never a dogs nails be that short. They do look nice though, I can tell the effort and time you put into them.
     
  4. neely

    neely TCS Member Staff Member Forum Helper

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    Update: I heard back from my friend on the dog breed forum and this is what she said -
    You can trim the nails every three or four days. The quick draws back almost immediately after cutting.

    Each time the quick moves closer toward the nail bed, so it doesn't take as long as you might think.

    I have a chart somewhere that shows that. I'll find it and post it.

    ETA: I prefer the scissors type clippers, rather than the guillotine style. I feel I have more control.
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    I have not received a chart yet but wanted to let you know what she said, don't know how much it helps though.
     
    sabrinah purraised this.
  5. sabrinah

    sabrinah Thread Starter TCS Member Alpha Cat

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    Thank you for asking your friend! I'll try trimming more often to get them a little shorter but I'm worried about getting too short. I also like the scissor type clippers. I've never used the guillotine because they seem like you don't have as much freedom of movement.

    I've been paying attention to his walking a lot more and I noticed there's not even the faintest clicking on cement, which there used to be months ago. If he is digging his nails in for traction on slippery floors is there anything I can do to help him? Trim the tiny hairs on his feet? They're already short but they could be shorter. Mushers Secret on his pads? Any of these anti-slip thingies?

    Dr. Buzby's ToeGrips for Dogs - Helping people. Helping dogs.
    Why Socks for Dogs
    Paw-Pads™ Self-Adhesive Traction Pads
     
  6. NewYork1303

    NewYork1303 TCS Member Top Cat

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    Most dogs have a maximum point to where the quick will go back to. Those nails are really short, so it may not be possible to get them much shorter. It may not help with click clacking when prancing in any case since this usually happens since the top part of the nail touches the ground as a dogs foot goes up or down, not something that can be fixed as long as a dog has any nail at all.

    That said anyone with hardwood floors should be trimming paw hair in between toes and around the edges of the paws just to prevent dogs from injuring themselves. (It looks to me like you do that already?) This helps give dogs a lot more traction.
     
  7. sabrinah

    sabrinah Thread Starter TCS Member Alpha Cat

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    I only trim the hairs a little bit since they're naturally fairly short, but if I got better scissors I could trim shorter. He would most certainly kick me in the face while I trim though so I'm not sure it's worth it. It's so sad, when he sits on the hardwood or tile his front feet just slowly side away. Even while standing he usually has one foot that can't hold its ground.

    He got his weekly nail trim this morning and like usual it made no difference in the clicking. He hurt both his carpal pads playing in the yard (no clue on what) and refused to stop chewing at the bandages so he's now in a cone of shame. In addition to the clicking, he's running into everything! When he was neutered he had to be in a cone for 2 months because one of the internal stitches got infected and he had to go back under for cleaning and restitching. He literally took chunks out of the wall with his cone.
     
  8. NewYork1303

    NewYork1303 TCS Member Top Cat

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    Oh my. I've never succeeded in getting my dogs nails not to click at all. There is always at least one nail clicking even if I use a dremel. I have to trim her paw hair quite often. I have heard that some people use a beard trimmer to get the hair short. My dog tolerates having them trimmed with round point scissors (you can even use children's scissors) much better than having her nails trimmed.

    This is what hers look like trimmed up. If your dog has naturally shorter hair and doesn't grow large quantities between the toes as mine does, you may not need to trim them much.

    IMG_7476.JPG

    It helps with the slipping and sliding and since she is older, she really needs the traction. You can try musher's secret or booties of some type. But I've heard that musher's secret leaves a greasy residue around and most dogs don't tolerate booties.
     
  9. sabrinah

    sabrinah Thread Starter TCS Member Alpha Cat

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    She has the cutest paws! You trimmed them so neatly! Children's scissors are a good idea. My dog would never let me near him with anything electric. I used musher's secret regularly in a fully carpeted house but never on hard floors. Maybe if I use it sparingly and rub it in well? I'll let you know if there's any residue or if it makes him slip more. Of course, that has to wait until his pads heal.
     

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