Corona Virus Now Spreading

Willowy

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Yeah, it can't be eradicated because it's not a separate illness; it's strep that has gone systemic. Most strep cases nowadays get treated before they go systemic but sometimes you don't know you have strep so it sneaks up on you.
 

denice

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I don't know how much was understood about Scarlet Fever when I was a kid. I know lay people didn't understand the connection, it was thought to be a separate disease. I remember kids getting it on a pretty regular basis, not like huge percentages of kids in school but one here and there. If it got to be more then a few kids then they would shut down the school for a week. It was thought to be contagious in the same way as chicken pox or mumps. Closing the school for a short period was, and still is, thought of as a way to break the contagious cycle. I do remember my parents took it seriously.
 

furmonster mom

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Braved the petri dishes today.

Bank lobbies were closed... call for an appointment if you have a transaction that requires a person.

JoAnns, Michaels, and Hobby Lobby were closed. If you want to make masks, it will have to be with whatever you happen to have laying around.

Costco was splitting their line in two, one for seniors, and the other for everyone else. Thing is, both lines were being let in at the same time... so we were all in the store at the same time... so the only purpose to this was to allow seniors to essentially cut to the "front" of the line. It was odd.

There was no tp, bleach, or iso alcohol to be found at Costco, Winco, or Walgreens

Canned goods, however, were re-appearing.

At Winco, the bulk bins that used scoops for "ready to eat" items were purposely emptied. So, no bulk dried fruits, baking necessities (flour, baking pwdr, baking soda, sugar, yeast, etc.,.), limited pasta, limited snacks. Candy, however, was plentiful (I don't get it).

People were still stupid. At both Costco and Winco, the people behind me in line were at least 2-3 feet away. I still saw family groups, and they usually took up the entire aisle without consideration for others. There were a few more people wearing masks... but not nearly enough in my opinion. Costco had employees sanitizing the carts, but you were on your own at Winco, and very few people wiped down. I'd say only about half the people were conscientious about social distancing once they got in the store. ugh!

Even with my mask, and my trusty soapy bleach cloth (which I draped on the cart handle, so I was essentially always wiping my hands), I still felt like I was on high alert the entire time. It's become a draining chore. I actually wish the stores that used to be open 24 hrs would go back to that, because I would love to go back to doing my shopping at midnight, thankyouverymuch!
 

denice

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I rarely go to the credit union but they have the notice on their website about drive throughs only and in person by appointment only. The government is supposed to be opening up a website for those of us who don't get a refund so they don't have direct deposit information for these stimulus checks. They have my electronic information but it is so they can get their money not deposit money. We are supposed to be able to give them our direct deposit information because they don't want to issue checks. Issuing checks means having to go out to cash them. Issuing checks also requires government workers to come in to print them.
 

vyger

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It's interesting because I just saw a Facebook post that's being shared that is "apparently" quoting an 85 year old man talking about how younger generations are weak because their generation grew up with WWII and things like Polio and Scarlet Fever and still went out and didn't hide. Also that they rallied around their government and didn't criticize their leaders* and why can't we all do that?

*That part made me laugh, only because I just watched a little video on the 1918 flu and how it got so bad worldwide because governments, the US included, kept it from citizens so that people would still go to war.
A lot of people were exploited back then, 1930 to 1960, and were used as guinea pigs for a lot of things. An example of which was the troops that stood by and watched nuclear detonations so the military brass could find out just how survivable those were. Chemical warfare testing, "medical" tests that were performed on the mentally ill, things like forced lobotomy. You didn't get to ask for a lawyer, there were no civil rights, on and on. It was only the good old days for the more privileged. And a lot of people died young because there were no medical treatments for a lot of things. Nobody talked about learning disabilities in schools. It was believed that some kids were just lazy and didn't want to try. There have been many books written about the injustices that were done back then. It was only a golden age for a certain few people.
 

doomsdave

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Oh, yes, the good old days.

In Epidemics, the Wealthy Have Always Fled | JSTOR Daily

As the COVID-19 pandemic escalated, many of the world’s wealthy have fled urban areas. Affluent East Coast city dwellers made an exodus to summer homes and short-term rentals in the Hamptons and Nantucket. The demand for remote cottages spiked in Canada. Private planes were booked to vacation homes around the world.

It’s not surprising, really. The elite have a long history of leaving town during times of illness. In 1832, as cholera swept through New York City, an observer witnessed how “New Yorkers scampered away in steamboats, stages, carts, and wheel barrows.” Farmhouses and country homes were quickly filled all around the city. Those who could afford it were racing against the accelerating threat of disease. But as historian of medicine Charles E. Rosenberg wrote, in analyzing the era in the Bulletin of the History of Medicine, “The poor, having no choice, remained.”
 

mentat

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I am struggling to convey to all my working colleagues and family and friends the risk, the transmission "veracity" and "behavior" of this SARS-CoV-2, despite them being veterinary workers, healthcare providers, service providers/workers, they think they are safe, because of a piece of cloth other their nose. I don't want them to wait until many coworkers and clients/patients they've contacted are symptomatic, before their employer decides to shut them down and send them home, already exposed, to presymptomatic/asymptomatic infected in that environment. I was able to convey the risk to my immedate household, newly organized in the past year, to support and care for me while quite unable, flaring intermittently, the protector that has become the protected, weak, dissipating, yet I was able to finally convey after 7 days of public protection intervention starting. Seven days they ignored others' testimony, experts' reports of severity, and continued milling all over our community, as usual.

Many of my "people" are ill, working, even with curbside triage and transport, exposed to clients, to each other in confined small vet hospital spaces, so limited compared to the cubic feet of air in a human hospital. They were treating skin allergy, superficial lacerations, dentals, only to fall ill and succumb, in the face of early PPE use, when they didn't distribute it all to the hospitals, yet. In their 30s to 50s, struggling to intensively self care at home, to weak to update anyone or call asking for delivery of IV fluids, protein concentrated Ensure or small meat portions cooked for them, laying in bed, unable to rise, vomiting in a bucket, no one to help them up, to hold the bucket as they are so weak and dehydrated, sitting in their own sweat and skin, no one to sponge bathe at a minimum. A doctor checks with them daily, but no caretaker, and some have moved to the hospital, when they finally developed difficulty breathing, dyspnea, and pneumonia. despite nebulizations and bronchodilator at home. Some have not made it. So hardy, strong, capable, and smart, daily striving in their field, their passion, but exposing themselves to a virus that is emotionally and mentally straining our care teams to the breaking point, so thin, which then increases their risk for poor health, poor vigilance in personal hygiene, and risk for becoming infected themselves, decimating our healthcare providers that are already too few.

My own usual nurses for my procedures and specialists, my family nursing, my CNA/CMA and phlebotomist, my familial CNAs, all exposed, all at risk, all working to fatigue, to self detriment, to poor health, for poor compensation, so much risk and harm to them, trauma with untold, inconceivable aftershocks and duration, affecting their daily life long after COVID19 clears, if they survive. Many healthcare providers are Required to work, despite their age, their diabetes (uncontrolled right now in 2 of them due to poor eating and rest habits in overloaded hospital settings), their screaming arthritis with no rest, their asthma and history of prior pneumonia, their lupus, their Crohn's, I don't understand putting high risk staff in that setting. Where are our morals and responsibility to the wellbeing, support, and respect of our healthcare providers? If they get ill, it won't be asymptomatic, or mild, they are not healthy, they do not heal quickly, it's taking 3-4 weeks just for them to be able call one of once a day, weakly, expending energy, still dehydrated, rasping, wheezing, at home, without a caretaker or someone caring for them after they cared for many. They never should have been working as high-risk potential hosts for this underestimated, silent beast of a virus. Even if they don't die, the damage to their lungs, is just beginning to be understood in China's medicine and research. The damage to their chronic disease, they were managing so responsibly and well, before the demands of working in a disaster zone. They aren't soldiers. They're compassionate, skilled, giving, intelligent providers of health and hope. This is so wrong. We didn't sign up for this. All the worry and despair and darkness. Colleagues and friends in NYC, waking up every day to a nightmare, if they managed to sleep at all, Required to return to work, to vet hospitals, stores, package/ship office, human hospitals, with no support, no safety net to rely on someone else, waiting for family test results, but symptomatic without a positive test is insufficient means to start paid sick leave, so they're younger, not symptomatic themselves, but could still be asymptomatically or presymptomatically infected and feel so guilty that they are bringing it home, or taking it to work. The mental trauma of just feeling responsible for harming others. Employers could prepare, could mitigate the stress and the tension, but they pretend like their staff isn't hurting, suffering, so close to making a grave mistake for themselves or for others. They aren't allow reprieve, a moment to go numb, to disappear. They feel inconsequential, if they are working in veterinary medicine, as humans suffer, and humans die. They feel they are contributing to transmission by even remaining open, rather than send all ECC patients to select few, stringently abiding protocol ECC vet hospitals.

And then, a proposal from a state senator to pass hazardous compensation law, to demonstrate the respect, appreciation, and support of our workers slogging through hazardous conditions to work, for us, for community, for government structure, definitely not for their measly compensation (average CNA, store clerk, gas station clerk $10-11/hr if experienced. Nurses, avg $25-30k, with nothing at this time additional to demonstrate their value to the health community, to our fight against this coronavirus.

Just leaving home, is a risk, in any public space, especially enclosed premises. Yet, so many are against helping themselves with this bill; most are for it, but the idea that some of these workers feel they don't deserve it, they aren't making much difference, they feel useless, they are in public potentially contributing to transmission of infection, misplaced guilt, that is not theirs to carry, they are without hope or self-value now.

How can we show them, if not by supporting hazardous compensation, how can we show them a boost in morale, we value you, you are important, you must take care of yourself, you must have the best outlook, manage your stress, or you put yourself at even greater risk, as your health responds to your stress, your extreme physical output overextending, beyond your reserves. You all, they all, deserve the pittance of hazardous pay, while they serve all of us.

They need to know they are not alone, we know their struggle, we respect them, encourage them, they can overcome this, they can meet the challenge. How do we tell them, uplift them, without approving additional compensation, as they make so little already. Most cannot afford their own medical insurance premium, their own healthcare, and live communally with roommates, just to afford daily living, frugally. They display compassion in their personal life, outside work, helping others in the community, their dependent family, a neighbor who is sick, when they see a need, they fill it. They give and give and give, from an empty vessel, a hollow husk they are now dragging out of bed, trudging to work.

They deserve hazard pay, at a bare minimum. Throw them a parade when it's over, fill their bank account, and let them recover at home for at least 2 months of disability, if they survive this, if their PTSD isn't so crippling they need home care. I grew up and lived with PTSD veterans. Suicide attempts, one success. Deep depression. Rage. Violence. Alcoholism to self medicate. Neglect that put most of us at risk for predation in childhood and adolescence.

They are going to suffer for a very long time. And some of them feel so worthless, that they don't deserve any appreciation or compensation. We cannot let them down. We are so fortunate to have such selfless citizens, such community advocates, working for us, putting themselves at great risk, when they are high-risk themselves already, or need to care for their elderly and their children. We need to show they are valued. The are important. Their country supports them. They cannot self-advocate right now. We should. We must. If we don't want to lose them physically or mentally.
 
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Ceracera

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It was proven early in january that the virus can get in through your eyes. I hope doctors dont just focus on getting masks, but also try to get face shields.

wearing a mask doesnt make you invincible.

Heres a video that shows how easily viruses can spread via droplets
 
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6x16inside

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Considering the devastation of SARS, I don't understand why more precautions weren't put in place right off the hop. This may sound extreme but a quarantine / travel ban should be implemented. I know they have the main city where most cases came from under a quarantine at the moment, but It's not enough IMO.
Very true!!! I would nearly bet my life guaranteeing that a lot has spread thru the mail delivery systems which should have been halted.
But no.....keep in mind who stated it was a hoax with a childlike gleam in his april fools coming up mind.....
 

tarasgirl06

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I am struggling to convey to all my working colleagues and family and friends the risk, the transmission "veracity" and "behavior" of this SARS-CoV-2, despite them being veterinary workers, healthcare providers, service providers/workers, they think they are safe, because of a piece of cloth other their nose. I don't want them to wait until many coworkers and clients/patients they've contacted are symptomatic, before their employer decides to shut them down and send them home, already exposed, to presymptomatic/asymptomatic infected in that environment. I was able to convey the risk to my immedate household, newly organized in the past year, to support and care for me while quite unable, flaring intermittently, the protector that has become the protected, weak, dissipating, yet I was able to finally convey after 7 days of public protection intervention starting. Seven days they ignored others' testimony, experts' reports of severity, and continued milling all over our community, as usual.

Many of my "people" are ill, working, even with curbside triage and transport, exposed to clients, to each other in confined small vet hospital spaces, so limited compared to the cubic feet of air in a human hospital. They were treating skin allergy, superficial lacerations, dentals, only to fall ill and succumb, in the face of early PPE use, when they didn't distribute it all to the hospitals, yet. In their 30s to 50s, struggling to intensively self care at home, to weak to update anyone or call asking for delivery of IV fluids, protein concentrated Ensure or small meat portions cooked for them, laying in bed, unable to rise, vomiting in a bucket, no one to help them up, to hold the bucket as they are so weak and dehydrated, sitting in their own sweat and skin, no one to sponge bathe at a minimum. A doctor checks with them daily, but no caretaker, and some have moved to the hospital, when they finally developed difficulty breathing, dyspnea, and pneumonia. despite nebulizations and bronchodilator at home. Some have not made it. So hardy, strong, capable, and smart, daily striving in their field, their passion, but exposing themselves to a virus that is emotionally and mentally straining our care teams to the breaking point, so thin, which then increases their risk for poor health, poor vigilance in personal hygiene, and risk for becoming infected themselves, decimating our healthcare providers that are already too few.

My own usual nurses for my procedures and specialists, my family nursing, my CNA/CMA and phlebotomist, my familial CNAs, all exposed, all at risk, all working to fatigue, to self detriment, to poor health, for poor compensation, so much risk and harm to them, trauma with untold, inconceivable aftershocks and duration, affecting their daily life long after COVID19 clears, if they survive. Many healthcare providers are Required to work, despite their age, their diabetes (uncontrolled right now in 2 of them due to poor eating and rest habits in overloaded hospital settings), their screaming arthritis with no rest, their asthma and history of prior pneumonia, their lupus, their Crohn's, I don't understand putting high risk staff in that setting. Where are our morals and responsibility to the wellbeing, support, and respect of our healthcare providers? If they get ill, it won't be asymptomatic, or mild, they are not healthy, they do not heal quickly, it's taking 3-4 weeks just for them to be able call one of once a day, weakly, expending energy, still dehydrated, rasping, wheezing, at home, without a caretaker or someone caring for them after they cared for many. They never should have been working as high-risk potential hosts for this underestimated, silent beast of a virus. Even if they don't die, the damage to their lungs, is just beginning to be understood in China's medicine and research. The damage to their chronic disease, they were managing so responsibly and well, before the demands of working in a disaster zone. They aren't soldiers. They're compassionate, skilled, giving, intelligent providers of health and hope. This is so wrong. We didn't sign up for this. All the worry and despair and darkness. Colleagues and friends in NYC, waking up every day to a nightmare, if they managed to sleep at all, Required to return to work, to vet hospitals, stores, package/ship office, human hospitals, with no support, no safety net to rely on someone else, waiting for family test results, but symptomatic without a positive test is insufficient means to start paid sick leave, so they're younger, not symptomatic themselves, but could still be asymptomatically or presymptomatically infected and feel so guilty that they are bringing it home, or taking it to work. The mental trauma of just feeling responsible for harming others. Employers could prepare, could mitigate the stress and the tension, but they pretend like their staff isn't hurting, suffering, so close to making a grave mistake for themselves or for others. They aren't allow reprieve, a moment to go numb, to disappear. They feel inconsequential, if they are working in veterinary medicine, as humans suffer, and humans die. They feel they are contributing to transmission by even remaining open, rather than send all ECC patients to select few, stringently abiding protocol ECC vet hospitals.

And then, a proposal from a state senator to pass hazardous compensation law, to demonstrate the respect, appreciation, and support of our workers slogging through hazardous conditions to work, for us, for community, for government structure, definitely not for their measly compensation (average CNA, store clerk, gas station clerk $10-11/hr if experienced. Nurses, avg $25-30k, with nothing at this time additional to demonstrate their value to the health community, to our fight against this coronavirus.

Just leaving home, is a risk, in any public space, especially enclosed premises. Yet, so many are against helping themselves with this bill; most are for it, but the idea that some of these workers feel they don't deserve it, they aren't making much difference, they feel useless, they are in public potentially contributing to transmission of infection, misplaced guilt, that is not theirs to carry, they are without hope or self-value now.

How can we show them, if not by supporting hazardous compensation, how can we show them a boost in morale, we value you, you are important, you must take care of yourself, you must have the best outlook, manage your stress, or you put yourself at even greater risk, as your health responds to your stress, your extreme physical output overextending, beyond your reserves. You all, they all, deserve the pittance of hazardous pay, while they serve all of us.

They need to know they are not alone, we know their struggle, we respect them, encourage them, they can overcome this, they can meet the challenge. How do we tell them, uplift them, without approving additional compensation, as they make so little already. Most cannot afford their own medical insurance premium, their own healthcare, and live communally with roommates, just to afford daily living, frugally. They display compassion in their personal life, outside work, helping others in the community, their dependent family, a neighbor who is sick, when they see a need, they fill it. They give and give and give, from an empty vessel, a hollow husk they are now dragging out of bed, trudging to work.

They deserve hazard pay, at a bare minimum. Throw them a ****ing parade when it's over, fill their bank account, and let them recover at home for at least 2 months of disability, if they survive this, if their PTSD isn't so crippling they need home care. I grew up and lived with PTSD veterans. Suicide attempts, one success. Deep depression. Rage. Violence. Alcoholism to self medicate. Neglect that put most of us at risk for predation in childhood and adolescence.

They are going to suffer for a very long time. And some of them feel so worthless, that they don't deserve any appreciation or compensation. We cannot let them down. We are so fortunate to have such selfless citizens, such community advocates, working for us, putting themselves at great risk, when they are high-risk themselves already, or need to care for their elderly and their children. We need to show they are valued. The are important. Their country supports them. They cannot self-advocate right now. We should. We must. If we don't want to lose them physically or mentally.
You may have seen this or another video about these men. Everyone should see it.
ER doctor who beat cancer twice dies a week after contracting coronavirus
 

Willowy

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Here's one on why bar soap, not sanitizer, liquid soap or any other cleaner, is THE thing to use to kill COVID-19 and HOW to use it
Thank you for posting that, it's a very good explanation of how soap works to deactivate and wash away the virus, and why washing with soap and water is better than using a disinfectant.

But it doesn't say anything about liquid soap vs bar soap, not even one word on that. I'm glad, because I think liquid hand soap is the best thing ever invented. I'm not dealing with any squishy gross dirty waterlogged bars of soap if I can help it!
 

MoonstoneWolf

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The makers of the Wyze cams so many of us use for watching our cats is branching out and making non touch thermometers as well as a smart soap dispensor. Very reasonable price too just like their cams are. I'll keep you updated on the status of the soap dispensor
 

mentat

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How a "chronic disease warrior" like myself has stayed alive, against all odds, and how my specialists recommend I protect myself and my family while we stay at home. A.M. Carter, saving chronic disease warriors and COVID19 warriors, during this shite storm of a war zone nightmare. A touch of humor, much dry wit, mythbusting, and how to avoid panic and obsession while keeping ourselves safe; 3 big tips, we must do, over and over, establish the routine, becomes muscle-memory we easily adjust to without Stress or Fear or misunderstanding. Be well, Be safe, Peace be with you. #covid19chronicdiseasewarrior #covid19warriors #covid19AMCartersavingchronicdisease #covid19seniorwarriors #covid19senioradvocate #overcomecovid19 #notonemorevet #slowthespread #flattenthecurve #calltodutyvets #stayhome #stayinghome #gohomestayhome #weareinthistogether #covid19squashed #youmatter #youareimportant #fightcovid19 #bethechange
 
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