Continuous Vomiting

Shameem

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Hello,

I need to know if someone ever faced the same issue.

My cat is turning 10 this August. She was never playful at all, very picky eater and only eats dry food (Royal Canin)

She always used to vomit around once a month, numerous vets said she's fine across the years.

Around 2 years ago, she would vomit 7/8 times a day, almost twice a year. The vet would make blood test an xray and says she's fine as long as her appetite is there.

This year, however, by the end of January she started vomiting for more than a day, once I saw a pinkish vomit I took her to the vet, she said it's blood. She prescribed nexium, didn't work so she kept her for 2 days in clinic under observation, my cat didn't eat or drink or use the litter box (she gets nervous outside the home). When returned home the vomitting has stopped.

By the end of March, same thing happened. I reduced her food intake thinking it will help. She kept on vomiting frequently for 2 weeks, I took her to the vet once I saw pinkish vomit. The vet did more test (gave her coloring with xray to show if she has blockage, blood tests...etc) she didn't find anything. Prescribed nexium for 5 days, and probiotic to be giving daily, and only feed her digestive food and hairball treatment. By the next day of this she stopped vomiting. I thought a solution was found.

Unfortunately, 2 days ago she started this vomiting cycle with pinkish tone. The clinic is closed for holidays, so I gave her nexium but still the vomiting is not improved. I am planning to take her to the vet when it opens, however, they usually cannot find a cause for this.

Worth noting the she doesn't seem sick, it's just after 2 days of vomiting she will reduce her eating so the her energy is less. She also uses the litter box normally.

I feel sorry for her since she's limited to 1 type of food with no treats as per vet request, yet it's still not helping.

Sorry for the lengthy post but if someone ever faced something similar, please let me know if you got a solution. I am very worried since neither the vet or me can figure out what's wrong😭😭
 

Xena44

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did the pinkish coloration to the vomit happen after she had vomited a few times? That would be an indication of esophageal irritation due to the previous vomiting. tiny blood vessels in the throat can bleed due to the trauma. Or is the color in all the vomit? That would most likely be indicative of bleeding from elsewhere than the throat. Has your vet ever tried anti-inflammatories? Like your kitty possibly has the vomiting form of Irritable Bowel disease? Is there ever hair or hair balls in the vomit? Is the vomiting any better from the special diet? Does she take the nexium daily or just when she vomits? Stools are normal? What diet does your vet have her on? Is there anything at all that she could be exposed to that would bring about these episodes?
 

tyleete

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For one, is suggest seeking a second opinion. They tellus to do that for human doctors. It's valid for pets too. I adopted a 10yr old from the shelter that would throw up daily. Took 2yrs of constantly trying new diets and Rx foods till a new doc in the office said... You should see a specialists. Turns out she has Cancer. 2nd opinions can be a life saver. Literally. I don't use Nexium, but an anti-nausea med called Ondansetron. 1/4 of a small pill and can be given every 24hrs.
That kitty had to go on chemo. And took Prednisolone nightly to stop the vomiting. Till I was told about cbd. I was able to ditch the steroids and now and takes 8 drops of salmon flavored cbd for cats twice a day. At most she might throw up once a month now. But I'd definitely take her elsewhere just to ease your mind. Best of luck. 💗
 

Xena44

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For one, is suggest seeking a second opinion. They tellus to do that for human doctors. It's valid for pets too. I adopted a 10yr old from the shelter that would throw up daily. Took 2yrs of constantly trying new diets and Rx foods till a new doc in the office said... You should see a specialists. Turns out she has Cancer. 2nd opinions can be a life saver. Literally. I don't use Nexium, but an anti-nausea med called Ondansetron. 1/4 of a small pill and can be given every 24hrs.
That kitty had to go on chemo. And took Prednisolone nightly to stop the vomiting. Till I was told about cbd. I was able to ditch the steroids and now and takes 8 drops of salmon flavored cbd for cats twice a day. At most she might throw up once a month now. But I'd definitely take her elsewhere just to ease your mind. Best of luck. 💗
Cbd worked! That is more than awesome!!! Definitely a 2nd opinion. Really seems like her vet is missing something.
 
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Shameem

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did the pinkish coloration to the vomit happen after she had vomited a few times? That would be an indication of esophageal irritation due to the previous vomiting. tiny blood vessels in the throat can bleed due to the trauma. Or is the color in all the vomit? That would most likely be indicative of bleeding from elsewhere than the throat. Has your vet ever tried anti-inflammatories? Like your kitty possibly has the vomiting form of Irritable Bowel disease? Is there ever hair or hair balls in the vomit? Is the vomiting any better from the special diet? Does she take the nexium daily or just when she vomits? Stools are normal? What diet does your vet have her on? Is there anything at all that she could be exposed to that would bring about these episodes?
1. The vomit is Pinkish after vomiting a few times, so I guess it's due to irritation

2. After xray with the coloring, she told me the movement of her bowls seems fine. Anyway, I'll check this point again when I take her there

3. No, these vomits cycles do not contain hairballs, she just vomits the food within an hour after she eats (I give her small portions to make sure it's not from overeating)

4. It seems the diet has no effect as I thought, introduced last month and now she's back to vomiting

5.No the nexium was only prescribed 5 days last month, and I gave it to her 2 days ago till the clinic opens.

6. Stools normal, noticed one when scooping with diarrhea. Might be due to hairball paste

7. The vet diet is only Royal Canin Digestive dry food, hairball paste, and probiotic daily. No treats. My cat is obbsessed with Northwest naturals freeze dried chicken but she asked me to stop it as well.

8. Don't think she's exposed to anything. Just like any regular day.
 
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Shameem

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For one, is suggest seeking a second opinion. They tellus to do that for human doctors. It's valid for pets too. I adopted a 10yr old from the shelter that would throw up daily. Took 2yrs of constantly trying new diets and Rx foods till a new doc in the office said... You should see a specialists. Turns out she has Cancer. 2nd opinions can be a life saver. Literally. I don't use Nexium, but an anti-nausea med called Ondansetron. 1/4 of a small pill and can be given every 24hrs.
That kitty had to go on chemo. And took Prednisolone nightly to stop the vomiting. Till I was told about cbd. I was able to ditch the steroids and now and takes 8 drops of salmon flavored cbd for cats twice a day. At most she might throw up once a month now. But I'd definitely take her elsewhere just to ease your mind. Best of luck. 💗
I wish I can get a 2nd opinion, but this is the only good clinic here, the only one that has xrays and blood tests😂

The vet ruled out cancer as the xray didn't show a mass and her stomach was normal shape and size.

I appreciate your tips, I'll talk to the vet about Ondansetron. And I'll try the CBD, hopefully I can find a website that delivers it here.
 

FeebysOwner

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Pancreatitis??? Ask for specific blood test.
I agree - this ought to be ruled out. Pancreatitis can occur randomly and sporadically. Cats can have and recover from an acute episode of pancreatitis, and then may continue to have recurrent bouts of pancreatitis. The test is Pancreas-Specific Lipase (fPLI or SPEC-FPL). The test is not full proof but may be worth having it done anyway.
Here is an article (one of many on the internet) about pancreatitis in cats.
Pancreatitis in Cats | VCA Animal Hospital (vcahospitals.com)
 
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Shameem

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I agree - this ought to be ruled out. Pancreatitis can occur randomly and sporadically. Cats can have and recover from an acute episode of pancreatitis, and then may continue to have recurrent bouts of pancreatitis. The test is Pancreas-Specific Lipase (fPLI or SPEC-FPL). The test is not full proof but may be worth having it done anyway.
Here is an article (one of many on the internet) about pancreatitis in cats.
Pancreatitis in Cats | VCA Animal Hospital (vcahospitals.com)
Thanks for the article, her white blood cells count are normal as well as liver functions. But I think it's worth asking for the specific test.
 

daftcat75

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It could still be IBD or GI lymphoma. Those may not be observed in xrays or contrast studies. For those, she will need an ultrasound.

If that’s not available where you are, you can try to skip ahead to the treatment. A grain-free novel protein diet would be recommended. It only has to be novel to her. Not all cats. So if she’s always eaten chicken, turkey might be novel enough without having to go to rarer and more expensive proteins like rabbit and venison. I would also avoid fish. And I would try to get more wet food than dry food into her diet. Not only is wet more digestible, but it’s easier to limit the number of ingredients (while looking for which ones cause her grief) with wet than with dry. The extra moisture in wet food is irreplaceable with water bowls and fountains. Cats do not and will not drink as much water from a fountain as they can get from a wet food diet—even those who are avid drinkers.

I want to recommend steroids. But only if you can confirm inflammation with an ultrasound. I don’t think they should be blindly prescribed unless your vet has a strict plan to evaluate for a limited period. Steroids come with their own risks and should be prescribed with someone who is knowledgeable enough to manage long term use.

Subcutaneous fluids and B12 shots can be helpful anytime she has one of these vomiting episodes. I’m not suggesting you have to take her down every time she vomits. But if she’s been vomiting for a few days, that’s very dehydrating. And if she is losing her appetite, sometimes the fluids can give a helpful boost. B12, necessary for digestion and a number of other vital heart and nerve functions, is depleted by chronic vomiting. If her gut is also inflamed due to IBD or lymphoma, then her ability to absorb B12 from food will be hindered. B12 shots are extremely safe. Any excess she doesn’t need she will harmlessly pee out.

If she’s able to gain or maintain her weight, it’s probably not GI lymphoma. But IBD poorly managed can progress to lymphoma. You want to get this controlled even if that means taking her some place further away for more specialized evaluation.
 
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John Perram

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For one, is suggest seeking a second opinion. They tellus to do that for human doctors. It's valid for pets too. I adopted a 10yr old from the shelter that would throw up daily. Took 2yrs of constantly trying new diets and Rx foods till a new doc in the office said... You should see a specialists. Turns out she has Cancer. 2nd opinions can be a life saver. Literally. I don't use Nexium, but an anti-nausea med called Ondansetron. 1/4 of a small pill and can be given every 24hrs.
That kitty had to go on chemo. And took Prednisolone nightly to stop the vomiting. Till I was told about cbd. I was able to ditch the steroids and now and takes 8 drops of salmon flavored cbd for cats twice a day. At most she might throw up once a month now. But I'd definitely take her elsewhere just to ease your mind. Best of luck. 💗
I agree 100% I changed my cats vet and got a real explanation behind the lumps I heard by the old vet. Seems my Sammy has cancer in the lungs.
 
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Shameem

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It could still be IBD or GI lymphoma. Those may not be observed in xrays or contrast studies. For those, she will need an ultrasound.

If that’s not available where you are, you can try to skip ahead to the treatment. A grain-free novel protein diet would be recommended. It only has to be novel to her. Not all cats. So if she’s always eaten chicken, turkey might be novel enough without having to go to rarer and more expensive proteins like rabbit and venison. I would also avoid fish. And I would try to get more wet food than dry food into her diet. Not only is wet more digestible, but it’s easier to limit the number of ingredients (while looking for which ones cause her grief) with wet than with dry. The extra moisture in wet food is irreplaceable with water bowls and fountains. Cats do not and will not drink as much water from a fountain as they can get from a wet food diet—even those who are avid drinkers.

I want to recommend steroids. But only if you can confirm inflammation with an ultrasound. I don’t think they should be blindly prescribed unless your vet has a strict plan to evaluate for a limited period. Steroids come with their own risks and should be prescribed with someone who is knowledgeable enough to manage long term use.

Subcutaneous fluids and B12 shots can be helpful anytime she has one of these vomiting episodes. I’m not suggesting you have to take her down every time she vomits. But if she’s been vomiting for a few days, that’s very dehydrating. And if she is losing her appetite, sometimes the fluids can give a helpful boost. B12, necessary for digestion and a number of other vital heart and nerve functions, is depleted by chronic vomiting. If her gut is also inflamed due to IBD or lymphoma, then her ability to absorb B12 from food will be hindered. B12 shots are extremely safe. Any excess she doesn’t need she will harmlessly pee out.

If she’s able to gain or maintain her weight, it’s probably not GI lymphoma. But IBD poorly managed can progress to lymphoma. You want to get this controlled even if that means taking her some place further away for more specialized evaluation.
Thanks for the helpful tips, since she was a kitten I have always tried to introduce her to wet food, removed her dry food thinking if she got hungry she'll eat, but it never works. She barely licks it and that's it

For Novel protien, I tried freeze dried chicken (she loooves it) and freeze dried Turkey (she didn't like, ate very little of it). I saw they have Rabbit so I might try that.

The vet didn't mention ultrasound, but I'll check if they have it, I'll also ask for the b12 shots.

She is able to maintain her weight (13 lbs now) , she doesn't seem sick as I mentioned. This is why we are perplexed as why it keeps on happening. It might actually might be IBD.

I am happy though today she stopped vomiting after day 3 of nexium.
 

Xena44

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It could still be IBD or GI lymphoma. Those may not be observed in xrays or contrast studies. For those, she will need an ultrasound.

If that’s not available where you are, you can try to skip ahead to the treatment. A grain-free novel protein diet would be recommended. It only has to be novel to her. Not all cats. So if she’s always eaten chicken, turkey might be novel enough without having to go to rarer and more expensive proteins like rabbit and venison. I would also avoid fish. And I would try to get more wet food than dry food into her diet. Not only is wet more digestible, but it’s easier to limit the number of ingredients (while looking for which ones cause her grief) with wet than with dry. The extra moisture in wet food is irreplaceable with water bowls and fountains. Cats do not and will not drink as much water from a fountain as they can get from a wet food diet—even those who are avid drinkers.

I want to recommend steroids. But only if you can confirm inflammation with an ultrasound. I don’t think they should be blindly prescribed unless your vet has a strict plan to evaluate for a limited period. Steroids come with their own risks and should be prescribed with someone who is knowledgeable enough to manage long term use.

Subcutaneous fluids and B12 shots can be helpful anytime she has one of these vomiting episodes. I’m not suggesting you have to take her down every time she vomits. But if she’s been vomiting for a few days, that’s very dehydrating. And if she is losing her appetite, sometimes the fluids can give a helpful boost. B12, necessary for digestion and a number of other vital heart and nerve functions, is depleted by chronic vomiting. If her gut is also inflamed due to IBD or lymphoma, then her ability to absorb B12 from food will be hindered. B12 shots are extremely safe. Any excess she doesn’t need she will harmlessly pee out.

If she’s able to gain or maintain her weight, it’s probably not GI lymphoma. But IBD poorly managed can progress to lymphoma. You want to get this controlled even if that means taking her some place further away for more specialized evaluation.
Lots of great info!
 
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Shameem

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She could also be allergic to chicken.. My Artie was.... check the labels on food...
Thanks, I didn't even know that they could develop allergies later in life. I hope I can find royal canin hypoallergenic here to test if this would work
 

artiemom

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Royal Canin canned food is slowly returning stock.. I am talking about the prescription one

I know it is almost impossible, but try to find a food that does not contain chicken and she how that goes...

My gut feeling is allergies are developed by eating the same food over and over again.. in addition to all the junk in the eco system...
 

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I don't think it would be cancer as you say this has been going on on-and-off for 2 years, and she even keeps her weight normal. It could still be IBD or IBS and ultrasound could help to diagnose IBD. IBS is more short-lived as a problem and could be triggered by things like stress alone, so if things are OK on the day of the ultrasound, it can't be seen. If not for the time being, for the future I suggest looking at the nearest clinics with an internist or at least a vet who is good at ultrasound reading.

I read you use a hairball remedy (daily?) and probiotics, is she a long-haired kitty? Or does she shed too much sometimes? Brushing daily can help. They don't always puke a hairball when there is a hairball-related problem. Sometimes hairballs just slow down things moving down in the body, causing constipation or hard stools, and make them nauseous.

It's not difficult for the digestive system to face more than one problem at a time. I suspect she may have a chronic condition, that gets worsen sometimes by a secondary and maybe even third problem. Like I myself have IBS, I'm also lactose intolerant. I can handle some lactose on a good day with very mild symptoms but if I have a second issue that day, I get visible symptoms.

Also about food, my cat has several different grain intolerances one being wheat. Even some hypoallergenic foods contain one of the grains she can't tolerate as hypoallergenic foods are usually made with the assumption the problem was with meat (protein). Hydrolized protein diets are worth to try but they don't work for every cat and their food intolerances. I suggest an elimination diet.
 
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