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FeebysOwner

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Well, at least we know he can spray urine - but that does not get him 'out of the woods'. A fecal sample, if it has litter on it, will only be good for a fecal smear or float. The fecal matter must be clear of any litter for a full fecal PCR test. They can get a cleaner sample from him at the clinic, with a simple Q-tip type swab from his rectum. Not a wonderful experience, but very temporary and lasts a couple of seconds (kind of like taking a cat's temp via their rectum). If you can't collect urine in a sterile container while he is actually going, there is no real way to do it otherwise at this point. That will have to be left for the vet to collect some.

His temp is in the general normal range - 100.0 to 102.5. Just like humans, temps can vary; this range is merely a basic guideline. For example, normal for a human is 98.6 - I run around 97.0 and for me that is normal.
 
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Dheeksha

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Well, at least we know he can spray urine - but that does not get him 'out of the woods'. A fecal sample, if it has litter on it, will only be good for a fecal smear or float. The fecal matter must be clear of any litter for a full fecal PCR test. They can get a cleaner sample from him at the clinic, with a simple Q-tip type swab from his rectum. Not a wonderful experience, but very temporary and lasts a couple of seconds (kind of like taking a cat's temp via their rectum). If you can't collect urine in a sterile container while he is actually going, there is no real way to do it otherwise at this point. That will have to be left for the vet to collect some.

His temp is in the general normal range - 100.0 to 102.5. Just like humans, temps can vary; this range is merely a basic guideline. For example, normal for a human is 98.6 - I run around 97.0 and for me that is normal.
I have had catheters after surgery and it was simply so that I would not have to get out of bed. They are not a high tech medical procedure but could be very important for your cat.
He vomited again today in the evening. The food he ate 11 hours ago didn't get digested. He's not drinking water and not peeing. I took him to two vets today. They didnt do blood tests. Both of them said the same thing. They can't get accurate results. It only works for dogs because they use equipments which are used for humans. But the vet took the fecal sample and told me to bring the urine sample. I requested him to do catheter. But he gave an antibiotic again and told me to use it. If he didn't urinate by morning he'll do it. This is all making me mad. What I don't understand is why my cat is sitting like that and don't try to urinate? He drank so much water yesterday. He just sprayed twice in the morning. That's it. Why is he not trying?
 

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It is good that he sprayed, but it is not the same as emptying a full bladder, at least not in most cases. Does it seem to you that he is spraying enough to be voiding his bladder? Another issue is that if he is spraying and releasing some of the urine, he is still at risk from the urine that remains in the bladder. At this point, I think you have to stick to it and bring him back in the morning unless he clearly urinates. I don't believe he is not trying to urinate as it seems he must be uncomfortable by now.
 

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He just sprayed twice in the morning. That's it. Why is he not trying?
We thought our cat had a "spraying issue" but it turned out that it was his way of straining to pee. Peeing was very uncomfortable for him and he had litter box avoidance, but it looked like spraying as he did have some other behavioral things too.
Make the vet catheter him or express him when you go in tomorrow, and run both a urinalyses and culture.
For the urine analysis - Ask the vet if there are crystals or stones....If there is blood present.....If the urine contains any other cells, if it's cloudy or has mucus/clots.
The urine culture will test for bacteria/infection.

If the urine contains cells/clots or other things that can "muddy up" the pee, cystitis could be the issue. Which can be brought on by stress.
 
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Dheeksha

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We thought our cat had a "spraying issue" but it turned out that it was his way of straining to pee. Peeing was very uncomfortable for him and he had litter box avoidance, but it looked like spraying as he did have some other behavioral things too.
Make the vet catheter him or express him when you go in tomorrow, and run both a urinalyses and culture.
For the urine analysis - Ask the vet if there are crystals or stones....If there is blood present.....If the urine contains any other cells, if it's cloudy or has mucus/clots.
The urine culture will test for bacteria/infection.

If the urine contains cells/clots or other things that can "muddy up" the pee, cystitis could be the issue. Which can be brought on by stress.
It is good that he sprayed, but it is not the same as emptying a full bladder, at least not in most cases. Does it seem to you that he is spraying enough to be voiding his bladder? Another issue is that if he is spraying and releasing some of the urine, he is still at risk from the urine that remains in the bladder. At this point, I think you have to stick to it and bring him back in the morning unless he clearly urinates. I don't believe he is not trying to urinate as it seems he must be uncomfortable by now.
I thought he has the spraying habit until now. Poor baby he's suffering from urinary issue for so long. Totally my fault. Vet gave him Prednisolone injection today. He urinated. Emptied his bladder. I collected the sample and gave it to the lab. The report will come in 2 days. Actually lot of drama happened today in the hospital. The surgeon who promised me that he'll do catheter to my cat took a leave. I asked the other surgeon to do catheter. He said tom cat catheter tubes are not available and If we use other tubes it will cause more damage to his urethra. I lost my mind. He said he'll give prednisolone and lasix(diuretic) injections. But I was worried because prednisolone is a steroid. I burst into tears. Literally all the doctors in the hospital came to me and said things like you shouldn't be so emotional and attached to these cats and things like that. It made me much more mad. Seriously i'm worrying about him since 5 days. They didn't took me serious. They didn't diagnose his problem, didn't give proper treatment. Now they are preaching me all this. I have no words.
Sorry for the rant. I want to know this medicine prednisolone.. Is it ok? Yeah after I gave the urine sample. Their head doctor told me to bring the cat tomorrow for the blood test.
 

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I think you are making headway! If he emptied his bladder, there really is no need to catheterize him at this point. The Prednisolone is a steroid and often used to reduce inflammation. It should be a temporary treatment. So, I am guessing the vet thinks he has inflammation in his bladder. The lasix will help him to pee more. Test results of the urine will help to determine if he has an infection or crystals in his urine - which should aide in how the vets choose to treat him. And, the head doctor wanting to do a blood test is also a good thing!

Just ignore the vets' lack of compassion. Just smile at them (and cuss them out in your head) and let it go. As long as he gets proper testing and treatment, who cares what they think?
 

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I would like to add one more thing....
When this crisis is over and he's healthy and it's safe to do so, Please get him neutered. It should go a long way to help him with on going urinary issues moving forward. All those hormones do make cats more susceptible to stress related to territory, mating, etc...And a stressed kitty can lead to urinary problems, like cystitis...which is inflammation of the urinary tissues. The steroids will help with that inflammation, which is why he was able to pee. Short term use of steroids term is fine.
I hope he recovers soon!
 
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I think you are making headway! If he emptied his bladder, there really is no need to catheterize him at this point. The Prednisolone is a steroid and often used to reduce inflammation. It should be a temporary treatment. So, I am guessing the vet thinks he has inflammation in his bladder. The lasix will help him to pee more. Test results of the urine will help to determine if he has an infection or crystals in his urine - which should aide in how the vets choose to treat him. And, the head doctor wanting to do a blood test is also a good thing!

Just ignore the vets' lack of compassion. Just smile at them (and cuss them out in your head) and let it go. As long as he gets proper testing and treatment, who cares what they think?
No by that time he didn't pee. So I asked the vet to do catheter. But instead he gave prednisolone. I was not sure about this steroid medicine and also what if it doesn't work. It's becoming late. He didn't pee for 4 days. I thought catheter will be the best option and he's not doing it. So I felt helpless. He peed after I brought him home. I gave the sample then. I'm taking him for blood test today.
 
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I would like to add one more thing....
When this crisis is over and he's healthy and it's safe to do so, Please get him neutered. It should go a long way to help him with on going urinary issues moving forward. All those hormones do make cats more susceptible to stress related to territory, mating, etc...And a stressed kitty can lead to urinary problems, like cystitis...which is inflammation of the urinary tissues. The steroids will help with that inflammation, which is why he was able to pee. Short term use of steroids term is fine.
I hope he recovers soon!
He was neutered when he was 7 months old. He is 3 1/2 years old now. Mine is a multicat household. Right now there's a lot of stress in my home. And also I think I should change his diet. He's been fed dry food for the past 1 year because I have had no other choice due to covid and the bird flu outbreak in my country. Earlier I used to feed my cats homecooked food. Right now I'm feeding them the best grain free dry food available in my country. I want to switch him to wet food now. I need some guidance with this. I think the dry food and stress has caused this.
 

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I am so glad that you have had some results. As was stated, don't let the vets get into your head. It is not important what they said, but it is important if you let it get to you. As for the pred, when it is necessary it is important to give it. Don't worry about the fact that it had to be used. Your cats are lucky to have you and they are lucky to get dry food; think of all the cats in the world who would love to get a bowl of dry food.
 

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I want to switch him to wet food now. I need some guidance with this. I think the dry food and stress has caused this.
Get him over this issue with the peeing first. Let things calm down before you start a diet change. He needs some normalcy first of all.
Once that has been accomplished and some time has passed, you can introduce a small bit of wet food, along side his dry and see what happens. Some cats take to wet food well, others not so much. If he seems interested, just continue to feed both adding a bit more wet and reducing his dry by a bit, repeat, repeat, repeat. If he isn't interested in the wet food, you can try mixing a bit of it with his dry - in a separate dish from his normal dry - and, see what he does. How he responds will depend on the best way to proceed forward after that.
 

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He was neutered when he was 7 months old.
OK good....my bad. When you mentioned in another post that the vet referred to him as a "tom cat" I assumed he wasn't neutered.

And you're doing a great job advocating for your kitty....so don't stress yourself too much about the perfect food. When you can, you can always just try and offer him some wet food as a treat and see if he takes to it, and go from there.
 
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Get him over this issue with the peeing first. Let things calm down before you start a diet change. He needs some normalcy first of all.
Once that has been accomplished and some time has passed, you can introduce a small bit of wet food, along side his dry and see what happens. Some cats take to wet food well, others not so much. If he seems interested, just continue to feed both adding a bit more wet and reducing his dry by a bit, repeat, repeat, repeat. If he isn't interested in the wet food, you can try mixing a bit of it with his dry - in a separate dish from his normal dry - and, see what he does. How he responds will depend on the best way to proceed forward after that.
I am so glad that you have had some results. As was stated, don't let the vets get into your head. It is not important what they said, but it is important if you let it get to you. As for the pred, when it is necessary it is important to give it. Don't worry about the fact that it had to be used. Your cats are lucky to have you and they are lucky to get dry food; think of all the cats in the world who would love to get a bowl of dry food.
His urine report came. It is normal. Though there are traces of albumin. I gave his urine samples to two different labs. One report shows everything is normal and the other one shows antibiotic resistant. What does that even mean? He's not properly urinating still spraying little urine now and then. It's been 10 days. These vets are not able to diagnose his problem. They are completely useless. Today I took him to the vet. He gave him lasix and prednisolone injections. In few minutes his body temperature elevated to 103.6F. After an hour it got reduced to 102.1. Two days before it was below 100F. Why is his body temperature fluctuating so often? He's having diarrhea. His fecal and blood reports are yet to come. I don't know what to do. Can you guys guess anything from these reports?
 

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FeebysOwner

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The 'formal' reports you shared above look to be normal for the most part, and indicate no bacteria found. The hand written note must be from the second vet? Where is the actual report from them? The handwritten note suggests that the vet found bacteria in his urine and ran a urine culture to determine what antibiotics would work best on an infection/bacteria. You don't normally run a urine culture to look for the best antibiotics to use unless bacteria is found. So, I am unclear on that part myself.

Although his ph level is within the normal range according to whatever lab was used to run the urinalysis - it is from all else I have ever read slightly high and just means that his urine is overly alkaline which can lead to crystals being formed in the bladder. But, the formal report also indicates no crystals/casts present at this time.

I personally think the lasix (and maybe also the prednisolone) is/are overkill. The lasix could dehydrate his body - which can cause an elevation in temperature. The pred would probably be used to reduce inflammation - did anyone mention this? If that were the case, there are other anti-inflammatories that might be a better approach to inflammation.

It sounds to me like he probably has a form of cystitis - and many times it can be from unknown origins. But, it is often thought to be from stress, especially if the cat is anxiety prone.

I think you will now have to wait for the other results to see if they shed any light on anything. But, if it were me, I would question the use of any more lasix (or prednisolone) and find out more about what the vet thinks these will accomplish before allowing them to administer it again. He is already losing fluids in his body from the diarrhea.
 
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The 'formal' reports you shared above look to be normal for the most part, and indicate no bacteria found. The hand written note must be from the second vet? Where is the actual report from them? The handwritten note suggests that the vet found bacteria in his urine and ran a urine culture to determine what antibiotics would work best on an infection/bacteria. You don't normally run a urine culture to look for the best antibiotics to use unless bacteria is found. So, I am unclear on that part myself.

Although his ph level is within the normal range according to whatever lab was used to run the urinalysis - it is from all else I have ever read slightly high and just means that his urine is overly alkaline which can lead to crystals being formed in the bladder. But, the formal report also indicates no crystals/casts present at this time.

I personally think the lasix (and maybe also the prednisolone) is/are overkill. The lasix could dehydrate his body - which can cause an elevation in temperature. The pred would probably be used to reduce inflammation - did anyone mention this? If that were the case, there are other anti-inflammatories that might be a better approach to inflammation.

It sounds to me like he probably has a form of cystitis - and many times it can be from unknown origins. But, it is often thought to be from stress, especially if the cat is anxiety prone.

I think you will now have to wait for the other results to see if they shed any light on anything. But, if it were me, I would question the use of any more lasix (or prednisolone) and find out more about what the vet thinks these will accomplish before allowing them to administer it again. He is already losing fluids in his body from the diarrhea.
They gave this handwritten report only. They didn't mention what kind of bacteria they found in the urine. Nothing. I don't understand if those antibiotics doesn't work means other antibiotics will work no? They didn't mention which antibiotics will work. And yes you are right. The vet is giving lasix and prednisolone only to make him urinate. I did ask him why is he giving lasix and mainly prednisolone for what purpose? He said now we cannot give antibiotics because they don't work on him. So I'm giving these. Let us see what will happen. I asked him what is his problem. He just bullshitted. And the other vet said everything is normal because reports came normal. I cannot rely on them. But what to do? What does traces of albumin in urine indicate. I read it is some problem with kidney.
 

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I take it the vet that provided the formal reports is NOT the one treating him with meds, correct? Just curious.

In my layperson's opinion, traces of albumin in the urine is probably not considered an issue unless other testing, such as the blood work and/or fecal test, show something. If not, it may be that re-testing his urine would be appropriate at a later date to see what the level is at that time. Aside from a possible kidney issue, there are other illnesses/diseases that can cause traces as well.
 
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I take it the vet that provided the formal reports is NOT the one treating him with meds, correct? Just curious.

In my layperson's opinion, traces of albumin in the urine is probably not considered an issue unless other testing, such as the blood work and/or fecal test, show something. If not, it may be that re-testing his urine would be appropriate at a later date to see what the level is at that time. Aside from a possible kidney issue, there are other illnesses/diseases that can cause traces as well.
Yes. The handwritten report one is giving him medications. The other vet with the formal report said everything is fine.
 

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I agree with FeebysOwner FeebysOwner about the use of lasix and pred, especially the use of lasix which is really to remove fluids in the case of heart disease, etc. Usually, if a bacteria is antibiotic resistant it means that another one is used. I have a huge list of reactions to most common antibiotics myself but another one has always been found. Definitely what did the vet who wrote the report base his conclusions on?
 
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