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Dheeksha

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Four days before my cat vomited and he had a temperature of 103F. Immediately I took him to the vet. He said it was a respiratory tract infection and gave an antibiotic shot and some nausea shot. I'm not convinced with his treatment. And took him to another vet later that day. By that time his temperature became normal.. it came to 101.5F. The vet said it's just a bacterial infection. Nothing to worry. He prescribed oral antibiotic. We came home his respiratory rate got increased rapidly that night. It was 100bpm. The next day he was alright. Ate normally but still weak. His respiratory rate became normal. But from that day night his temp starting to reduce. It reached till 99F. I covered him with blankets and placed heating pads. His temp came to 100.4F after some time. The next day I took him to the vet. He said I'm worrying unnecessarily he's completely alright as long as he's eating. It's just the infection causing fluctuations in his body temp. I told him he's not drinking water and not urinating. But he said he'll be alright after the infection clears up. Today is Sunday the clinic is closed. His body temp is between 99.5F and 99.9F. He drank lots of water. But not urinating. It's been 3 days. He didn't urinate. I don't understand he's not even trying to urinate. He looks depressed but asking me to pet him. Mostly sleeping. Eating normally. The last time he urinated his urine smelled very concentrated. One month back he strained to urinate. I took him to the vet. He gave antibiotic shots. He was ok then. But now something has happened to him. How serious is it?
I read low body temp. occurs due to accumulation of toxins in blood. Is it Uremia?
 
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FeebysOwner

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Hi. There are many possible causes for a low temp - even some meds can affect a cat's temp. However, the issue to be most concerned with at this point is his lack of urinating for 3 days. Since your clinic is closed, please take him to an ER.
 
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Dheeksha

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Hi. There are many possible causes for a low temp - even some meds can affect a cat's temp. However, the issue to be most concerned with at this point is his lack of urinating for 3 days. Since your clinic is closed, please take him to an ER.
There are no Emergency vets at my place. The clinic opens in 11 hours. I can't do anything until then. He's not in pain or straining to urinate. He ate his dinner, cleaned himself, played lightly for sometime and sleeping now. But not active. I'm asking this because the vets are not giving proper treatment. I need to know the cause of his illness. So that I can force them to treat him.
 

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No one on this site is going to be able to tell you what is going on with your cat. Sure, some members might have some ideas, but that is all they are - ideas/guesses. You made no mention of any testing the vet(s) did, so I am guessing they didn't. Your best bet is to have a full scale blood work up done (CBC and Super Chem), a urinalysis, and possibly a full fecal PCR - which would test for many parasites as well as various bacterial or viral issues.

I agree with you that if none of the above was done, then the vets you have seen are merely doing a default treatment of antibiotics without really knowing if the ones they have prescribed are even addressing an infection.

Perhaps, if your cat goes outside he is urinating while out there - it is nearly impossible for him to be doing so well after not having peed for 3 days. If not outside, it may be somewhere in your home that you have yet to find.
 
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Dheeksha

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No one on this site is going to be able to tell you what is going on with your cat. Sure, some members might have some ideas, but that is all they are - ideas/guesses. You made no mention of any testing the vet(s) did, so I am guessing they didn't. Your best bet is to have a full scale blood work up done (CBC and Super Chem), a urinalysis, and possibly a full fecal PCR - which would test for many parasites as well as various bacterial or viral issues.

I agree with you that if none of the above was done, then the vets you have seen are merely doing a default treatment of antibiotics without really knowing if the ones they have prescribed are even addressing an infection.

Perhaps, if your cat goes outside he is urinating while out there - it is nearly impossible for him to be doing so well after not having peed for 3 days. If not outside, it may be somewhere in your home that you have yet to find.
Last month when he was straining to urinate.. he took an x ray and said there are no stones in his kidney. So it might been an Infection and gave him antibiotics. Yesterday when I asked the vet to do blood test.. he said it is not needed. I will take my cat to somewhere else. Please give me some suggestions what to do now. How should I identify his illness from the blood test.
He woke up just now and drank water again. He's in his crate for nearly two hours now. I would have known if he peed in there. He didn't. He didn't drink water yesterday and day before yesterday except for the fluids I gave him. But he ate solid food. Today he's drinking lots of water. I'm watching him closely I haven't seen him urinating.
 
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Below are links to what is tested in a typical blood work up, urinalysis, and a fecal PCR test, just so you know what is generally being tested and what each element represents. Normally, the test results will also include normal range numbers and will indicate when any of the elements are outside the normal range. With this information you are better equipped to ask your vet about anything you feel you need explanations for.

A vet will generally go over the results with you, especially if anything out of the ordinary is seen. Although most results are not immediate, so you might have to wait a day or two to get them. In any case, ask the vet's office to email you copies of all the results so you can look at them first hand and be in a better position to discuss them with the vet. If email is not an option, you can always stop by the vet's office and get copies.

What Blood Tests Can Tell You About Your Cat's Health (thedrakecenter.com)
Feline diarrhea PCR panel (zoologix.com)
Urine Testing: Why Test Your Cat's Urine | PetMD
 
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Dheeksha

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He woke up and
Below are links to what is tested in a typical blood work up, urinalysis, and a fecal PCR test, just so you know what is generally being tested and what each element represents. Normally, the test results will also include normal range numbers and will indicate when any of the elements are outside the normal range. With this information you are better equipped to ask your vet about anything you feel you need explanations for.

A vet will generally go over the results with you, especially if anything out of the ordinary is seen. Although most results are not immediate, so you might have to wait a day or two to get them. In any case, ask the vet's office to email you copies of all the results so you can look at them first hand and be in a better position to discuss them with the vet. If email is not an option, you can always stop by the vet's office and get copies.

What Blood Tests Can Tell You About Your Cat's Health (thedrakecenter.com)
Feline diarrhea PCR panel (zoologix.com)
Urine Testing: Why Test Your Cat's Urine | PetMD
He woke up and drank water again. He's in the crate for about 4 hours. All this time he's drinking water but not peeing. I petted him and rubbed him near his urethra. He made sounds like "phu" "phu" everytime I rubbed near urethra. There's definitely some discomfort over there. Now he's behaving completely normal and grooming himself. He's not peeing and he's not even trying to. How is it possible? I don't understand. Surgery has to be done immediately no? But is he hiding his pain? Or he's not getting the feeling to urinate? His body is not producing urine? I am really scared. What's wrong with him?
 
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Why do you have him in a crate? If he isn't usually kept in one, that could explain why he is holding his urine, as he doesn't want to pee in there. Does he have a litter box? If so, let him out of the crate with the litter box nearby and see if he tries to use it. Or, does he normally go outside to pee? If so, you can always take a cardboard box lid and place some soil/leaves from outdoors and let him out of the crate to try to use it.

If he is becoming blocked, and you won't know that until he sees a vet, then it could mean surgery. Or, the vet might be able to express his bladder and release urine, or use a catheter to release his urine. One way or the other, he will continue to become sicker and sicker and slow down or stop eating and possibly stop drinking.

Here are some instructions to check his bladder, if you are comfortable with doing so. The firmer/harder the bladder feels, the more urine is being held in the bladder.

Feel for the bladder in the lower abdomen. The bladder is located above the urinary opening but below the rib cage in the back of the belly. Press your fingers gently into the cat’s abdomen at the bottom of the belly and feel for a firm, round ball.
  • The bladder has been described as feeling like a water balloon.
  • Don’t press too firmly into the bladder as you are feeling for it, as this could release urine.
Tip: It’s easiest to find the bladder initially by holding your cat on its back and cradling it on your lap or in your arms. If your cat loves its belly rubbed, that is a good time to find it as well.
 

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At this point, I think that your clinic opens in about 7 hours, so just make sure you are there. As FeebysOwner FeebysOwner said, none of us can dx your cat but it does sound serious and the inability to urinate would have me very concerned. The last questions you asked are all valid but only a vet can tell you the answer. If routine antibiotics were given as a normal course of action only, more testing has to be done. Make sure you tell them that you believe he is in discomfort and that it is an emergency.

I also agree with letting him out of the crate to see what happens.
 
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Dheeksha

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Why do you have him in a crate? If he isn't usually kept in one, that could explain why he is holding his urine, as he doesn't want to pee in there. Does he have a litter box? If so, let him out of the crate with the litter box nearby and see if he tries to use it. Or, does he normally go outside to pee? If so, you can always take a cardboard box lid and place some soil/leaves from outdoors and let him out of the crate to try to use it.

If he is becoming blocked, and you won't know that until he sees a vet, then it could mean surgery. Or, the vet might be able to express his bladder and release urine, or use a catheter to release his urine. One way or the other, he will continue to become sicker and sicker and slow down or stop eating and possibly stop drinking.

Here are some instructions to check his bladder, if you are comfortable with doing so. The firmer/harder the bladder feels, the more urine is being held in the bladder.

Feel for the bladder in the lower abdomen. The bladder is located above the urinary opening but below the rib cage in the back of the belly. Press your fingers gently into the cat’s abdomen at the bottom of the belly and feel for a firm, round ball.
  • The bladder has been described as feeling like a water balloon.
  • Don’t press too firmly into the bladder as you are feeling for it, as this could release urine.
Tip: It’s easiest to find the bladder initially by holding your cat on its back and cradling it on your lap or in your arms. If your cat loves its belly rubbed, that is a good time to find it as well.
At this point, I think that your clinic opens in about 7 hours, so just make sure you are there. As FeebysOwner FeebysOwner said, none of us can dx your cat but it does sound serious and the inability to urinate would have me very concerned. The last questions you asked are all valid but only a vet can tell you the answer. If routine antibiotics were given as a normal course of action only, more testing has to be done. Make sure you tell them that you believe he is in discomfort and that it is an emergency.

I also agree with letting him out of the crate to see what happens.
I kept him in a crate because i have other cats. I cannot know if he urinates somewhere else if I leave him. I released him in the morning and watched him . He drank water and pooped but he didn't pee. I didn't see him peeing. Moreover he has the habit of spraying. If I had kept him in the crate it wouldn't have stopped him from spraying. 3 days before he urinated on the blanket in the crate.. it smelled very bad. I changed the sheets. Now the sheets are and bed are dry in the crate.
 

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Just do what fionasmom fionasmom said at this point and get him to the clinic as soon as they open. Tell them everything that has happened and insist there is something wrong and that they need to check it out further. In the meantime, be looking for another vet - because if this clinic won't pursue it they are a waste of your time and money, and could be jeopardizing his health/life. If you have friends/family/neighbors/co-workers who can refer you another vet, I would get a list and move from this clinic. Have you searched for other clinics/vets you might be able to take him to? I hope the clinic you are using understands the possible severity of this and acts accordingly.
 
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Dheeksha

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Just do what fionasmom fionasmom said at this point and get him to the clinic as soon as they open. Tell them everything that has happened and insist there is something wrong and that they need to check it out further. In the meantime, be looking for another vet - because if this clinic won't pursue it they are a waste of your time and money, and could be jeopardizing his health/life. If you have friends/family/neighbors/co-workers who can refer you another vet, I would get a list and move from this clinic. Have you searched for other clinics/vets you might be able to take him to? I hope the clinic you are using understands the possible severity of this and acts accordingly.
I searched but there are are no good vets in my city. I have to go to another clinic and hope they'll help.
 
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Dheeksha

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Definitely make sure that they conclusively rule out a blockage. I had a cat years ago who was a sprayer and who did suffer a blockage. It might be completely coincidental but I always remembered that.
How do they rule out a blockage? How do they know it? It'll take days if they wait for blood report and urine test report no?
 

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As far as I know, they will palpate his bladder to see if it is full, they may even try to express it and/or catheter him. Aside from that, I believe they will need to do an x-ray - fionasmom fionasmom may be better able to answer that. The basic urinalysis is usually immediate. A follow up urine culture, if needed, might take a day or two, as well as the blood tests, depending on your clinic.
 

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A catheter can be used in many cases under sedation to release the urine and flush out the plug. Actual surgery is not always the first step but getting rid of the distention of the bladder is crucial. Once that is done, they can usually assess if there are stones and surgery needs to be done. The blockage can be something as small as mucus or as large as stones. I should add that Fiona herself had surgery for bladder stones after repeated bladder infections; however, the vet told me that he had never once, in 30 years, seen a urinary blockage in a female as it is really a male issue and danger. For your cat, the most important thing is that you absolutely insist that the underlying cause of a lack of urination be discovered. Don't leave with just more antibiotics and a cat who cannot urinate.
 
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Dheeksha

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A catheter can be used in many cases under sedation to release the urine and flush out the plug. Actual surgery is not always the first step but getting rid of the distention of the bladder is crucial. Once that is done, they can usually assess if there are stones and surgery needs to be done. The blockage can be something as small as mucus or as large as stones. I should add that Fiona herself had surgery for bladder stones after repeated bladder infections; however, the vet told me that he had never once, in 30 years, seen a urinary blockage in a female as it is really a male issue and danger. For your cat, the most important thing is that you absolutely insist that the underlying cause of a lack of urination be discovered. Don't leave with just more antibiotics and a cat who cannot urinate.
Yes I 'll take him now. But I want to know if it's not a blockage there's no harm in catheter procedure no? And Does this procedure need stitches?
 

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Catherization occurs in humans, both male and female, all the time. There are no incisions involved. It is placing a tubing up through the urethra into the bladder to release the urine. Humans get catheters without sedation, but they understand what is going on, that is why they would want to use some sort of sedation on your cat if they decide to catheter him.
 
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Catherization occurs in humans, both male and female, all the time. There are no incisions involved. It is placing a tubing up through the urethra into the bladder to release the urine. Humans get catheters without sedation, but they understand what is going on, that is why they would want to use some sort of sedation on your cat if they decide to catheter him.
I have had catheters after surgery and it was simply so that I would not have to get out of bed. They are not a high tech medical procedure but could be very important for your cat.
He just sprayed now. He meowed me to open the crate and I watched him carefully. He smelled the house for half an hour and sprayed on the wall. I'll collect fecal sample and take him for blood test. But how should I collect urine sample if he's spraying. His body temperature is 100.2 F now.
 
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