Cat not eating, nothing wrong medically.

annaw

TCS Member
Thread starter
Young Cat
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
62
Purraise
26
My cat Big, is about 5 and a half now. Last smmer she stopped eating and I tookher to our vet and he said she had gastrointestinal issues. He gave her some food and anti nausea medicine and it seemed to work. This summer she was eating and then would stop for awhile before eating again. But the last two weeks she hasnt eaten at all. She weighs maaaybe two pounds. The last week ive been feeding her with a plastic syringe, and we fianlly got into the vet today. He did all sorts of tests and bloodwork and urine and stool work. He checked her teeth and mouth and everything he could. He said basically that she is fine. She doesn't have anything medically wrong with her. The vet gave us some hard and soft food and said if she eats, she eats, and if she doesn't she will unfortunately pass away. I will not let her pass away when she was doing just fine with syringe feedings. Just wondering if there could be anything else wrong? We havnt moved or anything lately, we did get another dog, but that was several months ago.
 

fionasmom

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Jun 21, 2014
Messages
4,937
Purraise
7,246
Location
Los Angeles
Your cat has not eaten for 2 weeks and the vet thinks it is okay? I would get another opinion as quickly as possible, and not from another vet in the same practice. Find someone else. You might use the Nextdoor app to ask for recommendations in your area for good vets.
A 5 year old cat weighing two pounds is not normal, and feeding with a syringe, which is certainly better than nothing and should be kept up if necessary, is not the answer. Some cats react to changes like a new dog, but this is beyond that kind of adjustment.
 

FeebysOwner

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Messages
13,792
Purraise
18,403
Location
Central FL (Born in OH)
I agree with all that fionasmom fionasmom has said. Trust me, I know it is hard to find another vet but you absolutely need to do so. This is really on the edge of an outright emergency. It might cost you dearly but you should consider contacting other vets and tell them you feel it is an emergency. Get copies of all the records on your cat from this vet you have seen so that they can be given to another vet for history and review - that should at least spare you the costs associated with redundant testing.

At this juncture, you should insist on a feeding tube, if your cat is stable enough to have one inserted - this would enable you to give your cat much more in the way of nutrients than you can possibly give through an oral syringe. A feeding tube sounds daunting, and I am sure at first it would be, but but many members on this site have done so and have found it much easier than they imagined. In the meantime, certainly, don't stop the oral syringe feedings.

Have you tried other food sources to see if she will eat those? There are a number of one listed in this TCS article (see link below). Another new one that has been working is Kentucky Fried Chicken (or an equivalent). Of course, many of these are not full of the supplements that cats need, but they are by far better than letting a cat starve to death.
How To Get Your Cat To Start Eating Again – TheCatSite Articles
 

daftcat75

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Sep 7, 2018
Messages
8,186
Purraise
14,841
I would also schedule an ultrasound. There's clearly something going on and blood work is limited in what it can diagnose.

I would also offer meat only baby food, tuna in water, or fried chicken (minus the skin). Any grocery store cat food is a good option as well. Popular brands are popular with cats. They would not be on those shelves otherwise. Right now it's more important that she eats than what she eats. Reveal and Applaws make meat in water complementary foods (meant as treats rather than nutritionally balanced and complete foods.) These can also be used right now. Exceptional times require exceptional measures.

You might also consider a feeding tube over syringe feedings by mouth. Most cats will fight you for every bite when trying to syringe by mouth. This is a stressful and ineffective way to feed a cat. Feeding tubes, by contrast, can be lifesavers. They don't require much effort or force on the cat. Most cats don't mind the tube at all. The only time my Krista minded hers was when I fed too fast or too cold. I got instant feedback. I learned and adapted. Other than that, I got all my supplies together, picked a spot in the sun for her, squished her down into an easy laying position, and she remained calm and compliant through the feedings. If it's going to be another week or more until you can get an ultrasound and a proper diagnosis, the feeding tube will take the stress off all parties and allow you to get her calories back up to something sustainable.

Feeding Tubes For Cats
 

LTS3

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Aug 29, 2014
Messages
16,195
Purraise
15,165
Location
USA
The vet gave us some hard and soft food and said if she eats, she eats, and if she doesn't she will unfortunately pass away.
I'd run far away from a vet who would say something like that :eek3:

Find a NEW vet. Get copies of all your cat's records from the current vet, including all blood work and other test results, and bring them to the new vet to review. Any vet has the ability to consult with a veterinary school and other vets worldwide to get help on difficult cases.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6

annaw

TCS Member
Thread starter
Young Cat
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
62
Purraise
26
I would also schedule an ultrasound. There's clearly something going on and blood work is limited in what it can diagnose.

I would also offer meat only baby food, tuna in water, or fried chicken (minus the skin). Any grocery store cat food is a good option as well. Popular brands are popular with cats. They would not be on those shelves otherwise. Right now it's more important that she eats than what she eats. Reveal and Applaws make meat in water complementary foods (meant as treats rather than nutritionally balanced and complete foods.) These can also be used right now. Exceptional times require exceptional measures.

You might also consider a feeding tube over syringe feedings by mouth. Most cats will fight you for every bite when trying to syringe by mouth. This is a stressful and ineffective way to feed a cat. Feeding tubes, by contrast, can be lifesavers. They don't require much effort or force on the cat. Most cats don't mind the tube at all. The only time my Krista minded hers was when I fed too fast or too cold. I got instant feedback. I learned and adapted. Other than that, I got all my supplies together, picked a spot in the sun for her, squished her down into an easy laying position, and she remained calm and compliant through the feedings. If it's going to be another week or more until you can get an ultrasound and a proper diagnosis, the feeding tube will take the stress off all parties and allow you to get her calories back up to something sustainable.

Feeding Tubes For Cats
I did see an article about tube feeding, but wasn't sure how it compared to using a syringe, or if it was more difficult taking care of it. Will definitely look into it though, she is easily stressed and i would love to minimize that!
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7

annaw

TCS Member
Thread starter
Young Cat
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
62
Purraise
26
I'd run far away from a vet who would say something like that :eek3:

Find a NEW vet. Get copies of all your cat's records from the current vet, including all blood work and other test results, and bring them to the new vet to review. Any vet has the ability to consult with a veterinary school and other vets worldwide to get help on difficult cases.
That was my first thought. I couldnt believe he said that honestly. I was so mad he would say that when there are options to help her. Will definitely be looking for a new vet!
 
Top