Cat killing animals

Alldara

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Pesticides kill most of the birds who die early either from direct contact or from killing the insects the birds need for food. Cats kill the birds who are old, sick, or weak, often from the effects of pesticides. Most cats don't actually chase birds, they tend to specialize - small animals, snakes, lizards, fish, birds. (Birds of prey and coyotes also kill birds, as do people with guns and even air guns.) People like to keep saying that cats kill birds because it's easier to blame cats than people or corporations, particularly giant systems like agra-business. After all if people started really admitting how many birds pesticides kill, they might start questioning how many people pesticides kill and we wouldn't want to go there, would we?

You might also want to consider whether it's kinder to let an old or sick bird slowly starve to death or die quickly by a cat. Your world view will determine your answer to that.
This is quite inaccurate. I've watched many a cat hunt outside of bird feeders to see them catch birds that are perfectly fine.
There would have to be those other creatures in your area for a cat to hunt them.

Even on the farm, our barn cats brought home just as many birds as they did moles, rats and mice (no lizards here). It was to my grandmother's great dismay how many hummingbirds were murdered by our indoor outdoor house cat! She got rid of the feeder in the end.

I don't think it's an 'or' situation regarding wildlife. There's many campaigns, at least here regarding pesticides killing wildlife including birds (more of a problem with owls and rat poison). Not so many about cats killing wildlife though you can watch it happen.
 
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Catmam2OceanBlue

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Keep your cat indoors and don’t let them out unsupervised.

Stop acting like cats killing birds is a horrible thing. Cats are predators and the killing is a part of nature and life. Don’t try to hide it from your son, he’s gonna find out anyway.

Remember- Each critter your cat kills is because you let it out.

Catify your home and play with the cat.Teach your son how to play with the cat. Cat favors him anyway.
I've stated I know it's very instinctual of cats to kill birds but that doesn't automatically make me enjoy that fact. Don't tell me what to do my son is 2yrs old it's hardly hiding it from him when he's asleep when the birds are brought in. Never once did I suggest I want to hide this from my son, your jumping to conclusions there. I think its very reasonable to not want bird blood splatter all over my sons bedroom.

Don't suggest I should enjoy having a dead bird chucked around my home just because that's what cats do. I'm aware my cat thinks he's doing a good thing but I have a small toddler to think about and bad health myself my immune system couldn't cope with any virus brought into the home. I am sorry I have a heart and feel for the birds suffering maybe your not as warm hearted.

I will not keep him indoors as he thrives off going outdoors and that would be cruel its normal for cats to enjoy going outside. I was simply asking some advice from a mother of a new kitten and a young infant and I see no issue in that what so ever
 
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Catmam2OceanBlue

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Someone is rather angry! I've stated I know it's very instinctual of cats to kill birds but that doesn't automatically make me enjoy that fact. Don't tell me what to do my son is 2yrs old it's hardly hiding it from him when he's asleep when the birds are brought in. Never once did I suggest I want to hide this from my son, your jumping to conclusions there. I think its very reasonable to not want bird blood splatter all over my sons bedroom.

Don't suggest I should enjoy having a dead bird chucked around my home just because that's what cats do. I'm aware my cat thinks he's doing a good thing but I have a small toddler to think about and bad health myself my immune system couldn't cope with any virus brought into the home. I am sorry I have a heart and feel for the birds suffering maybe your not as warm hearted.

I'm sorry whatever in your life is hurting you and causing you to be so rude to strangers. Only Hurt people hurt people. Get well soon

I will not keep him indoors as he thrives off going outdoors and that would be cruel its normal for cats to enjoy going outside. I was simply asking some advice from a mother of a new kitten and a young infant and I see no issue in that what so ever
Also let me add my child plays very well with my cat so does not need to be taught to play with him they have plenty play time throughout the day but as bedtime comes around my cat sees that as his time for attention hence the excitement and running around my sons room. Letting him out has been more positive than negative on his behaviour. Before he was allowed out he used to run out the door any chance it was open when I left the house and run into the road because he desperately wanted to go outdoors. So are you suggesting go back to that and risk my cats safety over letting him out and he happens to get ahold of some birds. It's perfectly reasonable to ask for some friendly advice about my cats behaviour without having rude remarks made
 
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Catmam2OceanBlue

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AbbysMom

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View attachment 433173
Catmam2OceanBlue Catmam2OceanBlue is asking about a specific issue.
Please just stick to that.

If you wish to discuss cats killing birds generally it would be best to take it
to
our In My Opinion forum as the debate can become heated.
I'm going to repeat this one more time. If you can not keep to the subject posts will be deleted and the thread will be locked. Please be respectful of each other when posting. Not all posters are from the United States and letting cats outside is much more common in other countries whether you agree with it or not.
 

Alldara

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Catmam2OceanBlue Catmam2OceanBlue the Catio or a harness and leash walk (if there's a second adult in the home), could be your best bet.

Where I live we each only have a small garden, and some have installed cat-jump-proof things along the fence or some chicken wire. I think you purchase the former from Amazon.

It's expensive to buy a Catio, but can be more affordable to make one.

A harness with a staked lead could be good. My aunt actually puts her cat lead along the clothesline. He has run of most the yard that way. Little critters would stand a better chance at escape and your cat wouldn't be able to strut them inside without you checking first.


It sounds like you're just looking for the compromise between getting out and not bringing things in that works for your family. You could try a few options and see what works best.
 

Hellenww

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A few people have brought up catios and harness training. At 7mts kitty is still full of stupid, invisible, endless, kitten energy. It will get better if you can hold out for 6-8mts.

The easiest diy catios use cube storage. They can be made any size shape you need and added to later.


There are also kits on amazon with solid shelves, ramps, and swinging doors. I didn't do a price comparison. Here's one

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09NN6DW3V/?tag=thecatsite

Neither the kits or diy photos show floors. I'd add that and something heavy on 2 sides or anchored with tent stakes. I could see a worked up take a leap at the side and tipping it over.

danteshuman danteshuman and others are more experienced with harness training and the most secure harness for a cat. Then you can take out in the yard with you and your children.
 

Hellenww

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I just reread this thread. I apologize if I missed it. Is he neutered? If not, getting that done ASAP will help.
 

iPappy

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danteshuman, I think your cats were never hungry and were taken away from their mothers before she finished teaching them how to kill their prey. My mousers were instant it was through the wall into the room slam broken neck job done. Mine that hunted snakes would bring them to me unharmed because she knew I wanted a pet snake and would have had one too, if Mom hadn't kept letting them lose in the woods.

I never had one that hunted birds. I've only known one that did and he was a quick kill (which either mom teaches or after the first bird gets away.)

Non-cat exciting moment was when a hawk brought down a pigeon landing with it a few feet away from my car.
My cats brought birds in that managed to sneak under the gate of the old catio, and it was later blocked off with bricks. The new one is VERY bird proof for that reason alone.
Speak of non-cat nature, there's a video flying around of a hawk diving onto a bunny, and the bunny started screaming like bunnies do. A doe (deer) came out of nowhere, and attacked the hawk. The bunny got away but the hawk didn't. There was speculation that the doe either had a fawn nearby or was acting on pure instinct from the cries it heard. And the number of "Don't mess with Thumper when Bambi is around" comments was pretty funny!
 

Cat McCannon

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I've stated I know it's very instinctual of cats to kill birds but that doesn't automatically make me enjoy that fact. Don't tell me what to do my son is 2yrs old it's hardly hiding it from him when he's asleep when the birds are brought in. Never once did I suggest I want to hide this from my son, your jumping to conclusions there. I think its very reasonable to not want bird blood splatter all over my sons bedroom.
My apologies for misunderstanding.

Don't suggest I should enjoy having a dead bird chucked around my home just because that's what cats do. I'm aware my cat thinks he's doing a good thing but I have a small toddler to think about and bad health myself my immune system couldn't cope with any virus brought into the home. I am sorry I have a heart and feel for the birds suffering maybe your not as warm hearted.
I'm not suggesting you have to like the killing. But it's a part of nature. The only way to stop it is to stop letting your cat outdoors unsupervised. Choosing to let your cat outdoors unsupervised is choosing to let the slaughter continue. It's choosing to allow your cat to continually bring wild creatures and their viruses into your home.

I will not keep him indoors as he thrives off going outdoors and that would be cruel its normal for cats to enjoy going outside. I was simply asking some advice from a mother of a new kitten and a young infant and I see no issue in that what so ever
The advice given is don't let your cat outdoors unsupervised. The key word is UNSUPERVISED. Harness train your cat and take it outside. Put up a catio and sit outside with your cat. (Even in the relative safety of a catio, cats should be supervised.)

You have a heart for the birds, but what about your cat? Indoor/outdoor (unsupervised) cats have an average lifespan of 2-5 years. Indoor cats average about 10-15 years and many live close to 20. Strays and ferals average 2 years. Cats allowed outside unsupervised are at risk of picking up diseases and viruses of their own, several requiring treatment for the rest of their lives.

There's a stretch of road I drive everyday to work. At least one cat is struck and killed by a car at least once a month. The last one looked to be all of 9 months old. Yeah, I'm a bit passionate about the subject.
 

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Where I live, it's actually an adoption requirement that cats be allowed outside, and I've only ever had indoor/outdoor cats. When I was a little kid, my cat used to eat pigeons under my bed at night, so I know the struggle.

As long as he's allowed out, he WILL hunt, especially while he's young. Personally I don't mind about the pigeons, rats and shrews (the robins are always sad though), but if it breaks your heart, then a catio might be best.

If he's going to keep going outside, then a few tips:

Try taking his prey away from him as soon as you see him with it. He MAY learn (it depends on the cat) that his snack isn't safe in the house and eat it outside instead. Also, if he brings it in to play, you may be able to catch and release before it's injured too badly.

Of course, any kill site should be disinfected ASAP.

Would it be possible to get a baby monitor so you can close your son's bedroom door at night and still be able to hear him? Or jam the door so it's not wide open enough for the cat to squeeze through?

Lastly, it's very important that any cat that goes outdoors is treated regularly for fleas and ticks, and his vaccinations are kept up to date.

I also strongly recommend getting him microchipped, so that if he gets lost and ends up at a vet or shelter, they can get him back to you. And if he has a collar, make sure it's a breakaway one (even if you decide to keep him indoors). Collars easily get hooked and the cat can be choked to death. I know somebody whose cat it happened to.
 

tiggerwillow

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Where I live, it's actually an adoption requirement that cats be allowed outside, and I've only ever had indoor/outdoor cats. When I was a little kid, my cat used to eat pigeons under my bed at night, so I know the struggle.

As long as he's allowed out, he WILL hunt, especially while he's young. Personally I don't mind about the pigeons, rats and shrews (the robins are always sad though), but if it breaks your heart, then a catio might be best.

If he's going to keep going outside, then a few tips:

Try taking his prey away from him as soon as you see him with it. He MAY learn (it depends on the cat) that his snack isn't safe in the house and eat it outside instead. Also, if he brings it in to play, you may be able to catch and release before it's injured too badly.

Of course, any kill site should be disinfected ASAP.

Would it be possible to get a baby monitor so you can close your son's bedroom door at night and still be able to hear him? Or jam the door so it's not wide open enough for the cat to squeeze through?

Lastly, it's very important that any cat that goes outdoors is treated regularly for fleas and ticks, and his vaccinations are kept up to date.

I also strongly recommend getting him microchipped, so that if he gets lost and ends up at a vet or shelter, they can get him back to you. And if he has a collar, make sure it's a breakaway one (even if you decide to keep him indoors). Collars easily get hooked and the cat can be choked to death. I know somebody whose cat it happened to.
Even with breakaway collars, regularly check they haven't jammed. I had a cat years ago, who had a breakaway collar and it completely jammed shut, we literally had to cut it off, it wouldn't even wrench open. So even with breakaway collars, make sure you check them regularly.

It was lucky that I saw his collar did not seem quite right and went to check it before letting him explore outside, if I had not of noticed, he could of got it caught on something and strangled himself.
 

HeyKat

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Even with breakaway collars, regularly check they haven't jammed. I had a cat years ago, who had a breakaway collar and it completely jammed shut, we literally had to cut it off, it wouldn't even wrench open. So even with breakaway collars, make sure you check them regularly.

It was lucky that I saw his collar did not seem quite right and went to check it before letting him explore outside, if I had not of noticed, he could of got it caught on something and strangled himself.
Yeah, personally I wouldn't put a collar on a cat. I just added that in case OP does have one on their cat, since there's more risk to it getting hooked on something outdoors.
 

tiggerwillow

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Yeah, personally I wouldn't put a collar on a cat. I just added that in case OP does have one on their cat, since there's more risk to it getting hooked on something outdoors.
My boy was allergic to some cat foods, so his quick release collar said "please do not feed" on it (so he wasn't getting a allergic reaction without us being there to get him to the vet)
 

treeclimber

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Yes I was never keen on the idea of letting him outside but he just yearned to be out so badly it got troublesome with waking my son and the constant meowing . There was only so much feeding I could give him when he whined. He always jumped at the chance to run out whenever we opened our door and I would spend hours retrieving him from under cars etc
If the constant meowing was getting him fed, that may be why he kept doing it, not because he wanted to go out. A behavior that gets a cat food/attention/something it wants is a behavior that will be repeated.

If you don’t want to let him go out, I’d suggest focusing on stopping the constant meowing rather than continuing to let him out or feed him when he does it.

Is there some room of the house where the meowing would not be heard by/wake up your son? If so, set it up with a litterbox and water ahead of time, and as soon as the cat starts meowing he gets to go spend the night in there being bored. Once he learns that night time meowing never gets him what he wants, hopefully he’ll stop doing it and be able to spend the whole night free to quietly roam the house.

If you don’t have a suitable room for this, you could also put a large dog crate in a part of the house that’s sufficiently far away from the bedrooms (it should be large enough to fit a litterbox and something cozy to lay on if he wants to sleep). You can’t “crate train” a cat like you can a dog, and the crate is also not meant to be a punishment. The purpose of the crate is just to contain him in a place far enough away from the bedrooms that the humans can still sleep while he gets this out of his system.

Another thing that might help with the meowing is a lengthy playtime in the late evening. If you help him burn off some energy before you go to bed, he may be a bit calmer/quieter while you’re sleeping.

Others here may also have other suggestions for stopping the night time meowing. If you didn’t want to let him out anyway, the best problem to solve is the meowing - if you can solve that then you won’t need to let him out anymore or worry about what he might bring back with him.
 
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