Best way to remove lilies without getting pollen all over clothes?

jokra

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I am moving into a new house that has tiger lilies in the front flower bed. I am afraid that I will track pollen in and make my indoor cats sick. What would be the best method of getting rid of the lilies without tracking in pollen?
 

Kwik

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I am moving into a new house that has tiger lilies in the front flower bed. I am afraid that I will track pollen in and make my indoor cats sick. What would be the best method of getting rid of the lilies without tracking in pollen?
You want to get rid of them completely,right?
So just use a big plastic bag,dig them up and in the bag ( flower first)& thsts that BUT don't expect not to get messy,lol

For messy work outside I always wear an apron that covers the front of me from my neck to below the knee and it stays out in my storage bin as do my work boots and gardening gloves..... I don't like my clothes getting filthy so that's my long time routine

I do love tiger lilies,reminds me of my childhood only like you I'd not have them anywhere near my cats--- highly toxic when ingested even in small amounts so glad you are disposing of them

Congrats & best wishes in your new home
 

Kflowers

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cover each flower with a plastic grocery bag, tie the base of the bag as far down the stem as you can. then dig that flower out and tie off the bag. Put all the bags in a large bag to throw away.
 

Kwik

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Put them on Freecycle for someone else to dig and take away
Love that idea- I hate to see flowers are plants thrown out- I just got rid of most of my patio plants except 7 hanging baskets ( all non toxic ) .....Found them all homes( about 35 beauties)took awhile though,wish I had known about Freecycle
 

Kris107

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I like K Kflowers idea. Cut off any blooms into bag before you dig. The digging will jostle any blooms too much. Once the blooms are gone dig out. Just wear an old junky outfit and throw away when done. Do you have a garage or something where you could even partially disrobe before you go in the house? Shower right away. I applaud you for getting rid of those. I love lilies, but I too won't grow them or buy them.
 

CatEng

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I have an "airlock" entrance where the cats can't go, if I don't want to drag in contaminants or dangerous things for the cats, I usually undress there in the dirty zone and put the clothing straight in the washing machine if there is a risk.

Another option is to get a tyvek suit from Amazon or something like that and wear it to remove the flowers and then remove it before you get back inside (practice a few times before to avoid cross contamination), then shower as soon as you took off the suit.
 

Kwik

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I have an "airlock" entrance where the cats can't go, if I don't want to drag in contaminants or dangerous things for the cats, I usually undress there in the dirty zone and put the clothing straight in the washing machine if there is a risk.

Another option is to get a tyvek suit from Amazon or something like that and wear it to remove the flowers and then remove it before you get back inside (practice a few times before to avoid cross contamination), then shower as soon as you took off the suit.
Not kidding here- do you live in a bldg with an airlock entry or did you have it installed ?I'm very curious to know,perhaps you are a scientist that works from home? Work or study hazardous materials? My curiosity begs....I know some folks still living in NYC and their Co-op Bldg Associations voted on Airlock Entrys during the pandemic---- I'd love to know what they do when several neighbors want the elevator at the same time?

Great for door dashing cats though!😀
 

CatEng

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Not kidding here- do you live in a bldg with an airlock entry or did you have it installed ?I'm very curious to know,perhaps you are a scientist that works from home? Work or study hazardous materials? My curiosity begs....I know some folks still living in NYC and their Co-op Bldg Associations voted on Airlock Entrys during the pandemic---- I'd love to know what they do when several neighbors want the elevator at the same time?

Great for door dashing cats though!😀
Just a regular house, but the entrance is completely closed off from the rest of the house, like a mudroom. We have the outside door, and a door to the rest of the house. No interlocks or air pressure differentials, sadly, it's all procedural, we only ever open one door at a time. But at least it allows us to store "dirty" items until we can sanitize them, and removal of shoes is mandatory in the dirty zone before stepping in the clean zone. I wanted this specifically because I lost two cats to dashing outside in my life, and I wanted to make sure it wouldn't happen with my current ones. Next house will get an even better system with a direct access to the laundry room and a washing station.

But I worked in designing pharmaceutical facilities for a long time, hence the airlock reference and the procedures I impose on the household :p
 

Kwik

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Just a regular house, but the entrance is completely closed off from the rest of the house, like a mudroom. We have the outside door, and a door to the rest of the house. No interlocks or air pressure differentials, sadly, it's all procedural, we only ever open one door at a time. But at least it allows us to store "dirty" items until we can sanitize them, and removal of shoes is mandatory in the dirty zone before stepping in the clean zone. I wanted this specifically because I lost two cats to dashing outside in my life, and I wanted to make sure it wouldn't happen with my current ones. Next house will get an even better system with a direct access to the laundry room and a washing station.

But I worked in designing pharmaceutical facilities for a long time, hence the airlock reference and the procedures I impose on the household :p
I too installed a vestibule myself specifically to prevent door dashing ,it has been peace of mind ever since,well worth the effort!

Thanks for sharing! Nice to meet you
 

silent meowlook

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Change your shoes before you go in and bag your clothes take a shower and wash your hair. You don’t want to track any pollen or any part of the plant inside.
 

Caspers Human

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Use Roundup, the herbicide.

Spray the plants with the herbicide and wait for them to die. It'll take a few hours for the plants to start dying and two or three days for them to be completely dead. The benefit is that you won't have to touch the plants at this stage. You can do it standing a few feet away, preventing any pollen from getting on you. Be sure to wear your PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) such as gloves, apron and eye protection. Roundup cleans with soap and water. Simply wash your hands with soap and water. Take a shower, afterward, for good measure.

Once the plants have died, cut them off and bag the remains then throw them away in an outside garbage can. Dig up the roots, bag them and dispose with the rest. Till the soil to be sure you've gotten everything. Properly done, there will be zero chance for those plants to come back up, next year.

I know that Roundup isn't popular but, in this case, I think it's the best way. There will be no chance of being contaminated by toxic pollen. Although Roundup is moderately toxic, it poses less danger to cats than the plants, if properly used. Roundup also biodegrades in soil within 24 to 48 hours. After that time, it will be completely gone.

The main reason why Roundup has such a bad reputation is because it is, so often, misused. It was designed for spot application in yards and gardens to kill identified pests. If used under those conditions, according to the manufacturer's instructions, it poses little risk. The manufacturer started selling it to farmers for widespread use on fields and that's where the problem comes. There's a difference between spraying a pint or two of Roundup on a targeted area and spraying thousands of gallons of it over acres and acres of fields.

I don't use Roundup very often. Only when necessary. I think this is a time when it's necessary. I'd rather have a few plants die that I didn't intend to kill than to have some bad plants end up killing my cats.

Use Roundup according to the manufacturer's instructions and follow them religiously. Wear your protective equipment as you should. Be careful and use common sense. Do these things and you will have no problem using Roundup.
 

Kwik

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Use Roundup, the herbicide.

Spray the plants with the herbicide and wait for them to die. It'll take a few hours for the plants to start dying and two or three days for them to be completely dead. The benefit is that you won't have to touch the plants at this stage. You can do it standing a few feet away, preventing any pollen from getting on you. Be sure to wear your PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) such as gloves, apron and eye protection. Roundup cleans with soap and water. Simply wash your hands with soap and water. Take a shower, afterward, for good measure.

Once the plants have died, cut them off and bag the remains then throw them away in an outside garbage can. Dig up the roots, bag them and dispose with the rest. Till the soil to be sure you've gotten everything. Properly done, there will be zero chance for those plants to come back up, next year.

I know that Roundup isn't popular but, in this case, I think it's the best way. There will be no chance of being contaminated by toxic pollen. Although Roundup is moderately toxic, it poses less danger to cats than the plants, if properly used. Roundup also biodegrades in soil within 24 to 48 hours. After that time, it will be completely gone.

The main reason why Roundup has such a bad reputation is because it is, so often, misused. It was designed for spot application in yards and gardens to kill identified pests. If used under those conditions, according to the manufacturer's instructions, it poses little risk. The manufacturer started selling it to farmers for widespread use on fields and that's where the problem comes. There's a difference between spraying a pint or two of Roundup on a targeted area and spraying thousands of gallons of it over acres and acres of fields.

I don't use Roundup very often. Only when necessary. I think this is a time when it's necessary. I'd rather have a few plants die that I didn't intend to kill than to have some bad plants end up killing my cats.

Use Roundup according to the manufacturer's instructions and follow them religiously. Wear your protective equipment as you should. Be careful and use common sense. Do these things and you will have no problem using Roundup.
I agree and I'm a cancer patient- lol 'Common Sense" .

Have you ever used Spectricide? You'd love it if you did,works even faster than Roundup and most weed and grass killers like this are pretty harmless to pets after they dry and you are correct in that 24-48 hrs they have degraded and are GONE....

I hate killing flowers but the Tiger Lily is an invasive species in North America that uses up the soils nutrients,kills native plants and destroys wildlife habitats everywhere it takes over--- though they are beautiful
 

Caspers Human

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I agree and I'm a cancer patient- lol 'Common Sense" .
Roundup poses minimal cancer risk if used properly. I don't see very many people use gloves and goggles when they use lawn chemicals. You can't blame the product if you don't use the common sense that God gave us! Common sense isn't very common, is it? :(

Have you ever used Spectricide?
I don't recall using Spectracide but I have used something similar, called Triple Strike. It contains glyphosate, the chemical in Roundup. It also contains diquat and dicamba, two very potent herbicides. The glyphosate destroys a molecule, inside the plant, that is used to manufacture chlorophyll. Without chlorophyll, the plant can't manufacture food and quickly dies. The other two ingredients destroy cell membranes inside the plant.

There's a state park, nearby, that became infested with Phragmites australis. The plant is super invasive and hard to kill. It will quickly overrun acres of territory in just a few years. It spreads by rhizomes, like bamboo, so just killing the tops won't kill the whole plant. It will grow back with a vengeance in only a year!

The state park commission had to apply for a special permit to use Triple Strike in a wetland area but the stuff killed off all the phragmites in only one summer!

I had some ivy growing at my old home. It was destroying the siding of the house because the suckers were pulling the slats off. I tried Roundup and it didn't work. I tried pulling the ivy out but it grew back. Finally, after hearing about Triple Strike from somebody I knew at the state park, I found some and used it. Worked like a charm!

... Tiger Lily is an invasive species in North America that uses up the soils nutrients,kills native plants and destroys wildlife habitats everywhere it takes over...
I did not know that! I'll have to talk to my contact at the state park to learn more about it.

I know where some Tiger Lilies are growing, nearby. I'm probably going to have to go out and do a little reconnaissance mission.
 

Kwik

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Roundup poses minimal cancer risk if used properly. I don't see very many people use gloves and goggles when they use lawn chemicals. You can't blame the product if you don't use the common sense that God gave us! Common sense isn't very common, is it? :(



I don't recall using Spectracide but I have used something similar, called Triple Strike. It contains glyphosate, the chemical in Roundup. It also contains diquat and dicamba, two very potent herbicides. The glyphosate destroys a molecule, inside the plant, that is used to manufacture chlorophyll. Without chlorophyll, the plant can't manufacture food and quickly dies. The other two ingredients destroy cell membranes inside the plant.

There's a state park, nearby, that became infested with Phragmites australis. The plant is super invasive and hard to kill. It will quickly overrun acres of territory in just a few years. It spreads by rhizomes, like bamboo, so just killing the tops won't kill the whole plant. It will grow back with a vengeance in only a year!

The state park commission had to apply for a special permit to use Triple Strike in a wetland area but the stuff killed off all the phragmites in only one summer!

I had some ivy growing at my old home. It was destroying the siding of the house because the suckers were pulling the slats off. I tried Roundup and it didn't work. I tried pulling the ivy out but it grew back. Finally, after hearing about Triple Strike from somebody I knew at the state park, I found some and used it. Worked like a charm!



I did not know that! I'll have to talk to my contact at the state park to learn more about it.

I know where some Tiger Lilies are growing, nearby. I'm probably going to have to go out and do a little reconnaissance mission.
Now you've got me looking for Triple Strike- rofl,never heard of it.... can it be purchased by anyone ?Trying to kill a ficus!
 

Caspers Human

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Triple Strike is the name of the commercial product.

IIRC, the name for the consumer product is "Strike 3."

Are you talking about the outdoor plant that grows those long vines? We had some infestations in the state park that I mentioned. They have to get permits from the state Bureau of Environmental Resources in order to spray herbicides. Instead, the cut those roots and girdle the tree's bark. They can't cut them down because, again, they need to get permits.

Cut all the vines, using a pair of pruning shears or a hand saw. Cut out a two or three foot section and pull out all the roots from the ground that you can. Destroy or dispose of any cuttings. If you leave them lay, they'll grow into new plants!

Girdle the tree's trunk, cutting away a 6-inch band of its bark. Make sure you cut down, into the wood. Don't just strip off the outer layer of bark. The inner layer of cambium, if left intact, will allow the tree to survive. You've got to completely remove the layer of cambium, underneath the bark if you want to kill the tree. You have to cut off all the roots, too, so that they can't touch the ground or anything, nearby, where they can extract water and nutrition from.

It might take multiple attempts to kill those plants but, if you keep at it, you can get them in one or two summers. Attack them before the fall and winter when plants and trees go dormant. Attack them, again, in the spring when they start to grow again. Do it once more, during the summer. If you're persistent, you can probably get them in one season but you've got to keep at it.

At the state park, they have whole crews of people (volunteers) who go out, walking the woods, searching for invasive species. The park management looks at those reports and decides on what actions to take, often sending the volunteers back out on search and destroy missions. ;)
 

Kwik

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Triple Strike is the name of the commercial product.

IIRC, the name for the consumer product is "Strike 3."

Are you talking about the outdoor plant that grows those long vines? We had some infestations in the state park that I mentioned. They have to get permits from the state Bureau of Environmental Resources in order to spray herbicides. Instead, the cut those roots and girdle the tree's bark. They can't cut them down because, again, they need to get permits.

Cut all the vines, using a pair of pruning shears or a hand saw. Cut out a two or three foot section and pull out all the roots from the ground that you can. Destroy or dispose of any cuttings. If you leave them lay, they'll grow into new plants!

Girdle the tree's trunk, cutting away a 6-inch band of its bark. Make sure you cut down, into the wood. Don't just strip off the outer layer of bark. The inner layer of cambium, if left intact, will allow the tree to survive. You've got to completely remove the layer of cambium, underneath the bark if you want to kill the tree. You have to cut off all the roots, too, so that they can't touch the ground or anything, nearby, where they can extract water and nutrition from.

It might take multiple attempts to kill those plants but, if you keep at it, you can get them in one or two summers. Attack them before the fall and winter when plants and trees go dormant. Attack them, again, in the spring when they start to grow again. Do it once more, during the summer. If you're persistent, you can probably get them in one season but you've got to keep at it.

At the state park, they have whole crews of people (volunteers) who go out, walking the woods, searching for invasive species. The park management looks at those reports and decides on what actions to take, often sending the volunteers back out on search and destroy missions. ;)
I can't get to the roots to cut them out ,they are so deep and planted against a fence( not my Condos property fence) and behind a cement wall so I've tried many poisins,bleach --- the bleach killed one section but the hedge is 2 blocks in length ----- Im trying to kill one section and have about 18ft wide to go ,I used tons of gallons of bleach and only managed to kill around 6ft of it

Can't get permission to remove fence for access to pull out roots with a compact digger - the retainer wall it's behind is about eye level - the property with the fence is 5 feet higher than this property so it's a problem
 

Caspers Human

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I must be thinking of a different kind of plant. The one I was thinking of has long, aerial roots that grow down like vines.
Kill those vines... Kill the tree.

Triple Strike / Strike 3 will probably do it. I haven't used the stuff in years. I live in an apartment building, now. There are landscapers who do all that stuff.

I can think of some things that definitely will kill trees but they are persistent environmental toxins that would probably be illegal to use outdoors. I wouldn't want to say things in the clear that might get people into trouble if they tried them.
 

Kwik

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I must be thinking of a different kind of plant. The one I was thinking of has long, aerial roots that grow down like vines.
Kill those vines... Kill the tree.

Triple Strike / Strike 3 will probably do it. I haven't used the stuff in years. I live in an apartment building, now. There are landscapers who do all that stuff.

I can think of some things that definitely will kill trees but they are persistent environmental toxins that would probably be illegal to use outdoors. I wouldn't want to say things in the clear that might get people into trouble if they tried them.
Gotcha- maybe you can pm me? Lol
 
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