Best carrier for cat who’s aggressive at vet

Twocoastscat

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When the vet assistants put my Jeter back in his carrier the zipper broke - was a soft-sided carrier that I got because it was large (he is 13-14 lbs) and could fold down. Since he’s extremely challenging to handle I’m not really blaming them as they were probably struggling even though he was still groggy from sedation. I’ve replaced it with a hard sided carrier- Amazon Basics Two-door Top Load Pet Kennel - which got some decent reviews, but I haven’t tried it yet and I’m not thrilled with the sturdiness and access. The top attaches to the bottom with six metal screws and four latches. I would never rely upon only the latches in order to allow the whole top to be removed more easily since he’s strong and I’d fear that he could potentially get out. But asking vet assistants to unscrew six screws so they can take the entire top off and avoid reaching into the carrier seems a big ask. Also one reviewer claimed that the top latches that open the top compartment slowly opened when his pet was in it due to its weight. So I plan to cover the carrier with a Feliway-sprayed towel and also put a strap around the whole thing so he can’t pop the top and get out. Has anyone found a good strong carrier that works well with a very “fractious” cat who displays extreme fear-based aggression at the vet? He will be medicated prior to visits but he will require full sedation since the meds aren’t enough to make him calm enough to handle.
 

Mamanyt1953

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Hek is a handful, as well. To the point that her vet has a "Team Hekitty," and at least two members are scheduled whenever she goes in, kinda handful. I use a top-loading carrier, but I also add to bungi cords across the top panel while she is in transit. Works for me.
 

NekoM

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From experience something with a limited amount of visual stimulation or something you can put a blanket partially over
 

Norachan

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Some of mine are former ferals and can only be handled very carefully. If Jeter will let you pick him up try putting him in a large zip-up laundry net before you put him in the carrier.

Even if the carrier breaks he won't be able to run in the net. It's much harder for him to bite or scratch through the mesh, so safer for the vet techs to handle him. Our vet can give sub-q fluids, draw blood and give injections without needing to take the cats out of the net.

With older cats and cats that have weaker kidneys repeated sedation isn't such a good idea as this worsens the condition of their organs.
 

Kflowers

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you can use twistie ties to fasten the top to the bottom of the carrier. I suggest this because the pegs the manufacture uses have been known to give way dumping cats in parking lots and streets.
 
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Twocoastscat

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Hmm. I think the net bag is a very creative idea but I also think he’d be frantic - that is unless the pre-visit meds really zone him out. So maybe if unscrew the screws - or at least most of them - but use bungees or whatever to hold the top onto the bottom it will ensure his safety but will allow the vets to unlatch the entire top, lift it off, and grab him with a blanket or towel so they don’t need to stick their hand into the top door which I think is kind of small? Outsmarting a cat is hard.
 

Kflowers

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The twistie ties are wire, so when you tie the top to the bottom, using the holes for the 'plastic' bolts the carrier is fairly secure. I will never believe any person with the cat's safety in mind came up with using plastic bolts to hold the carrier together.

You'll also want to check the fit of the front and top doors to be certain they are functional, and the parts are not bent. Again, this is a situation where plastic is called upon to do the job of metal. Plastic doesn't last as long as metal and you'll want to check the doors EVERY time you plan to use the carrier, because companies are saving every penny they can and because plastic wears out faster and must be replaced. They can do this because almost all the companies that make carriers are doing it.
 
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