Any idea what this on his stomach?

Sonicthemeow

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Neutered 10 years old 16lbs. History of rodent ulcers on lips. Changed to a natural litter and give him wet fish products as I hear thats better for cats with skin conditions. Brush him and take care of his mats daily. Refuses to eat any dry food other than cheap cat chow. I have tried nulo and iams. Lived in Florida a with him and pretty sure he was allergic to something there. Just moved to MI and he's already got better skin. Before I moved previous vet said he would need surgery to remove mass on stomach but they never said what it was or what caused it. He has been going to the vet once a month for 9 months and just gets steroids and antibiotics. He has a new vet appointment the 1st and I'm more excited about this vet as they have more experience with this. But I can't help asking, has anyone seen this before? Is this a rodent ulcer on stomach?


20220827_160135.jpg
 
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Sonicthemeow

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Replying to my own thread lol but I stumbled on this article posted here
Eosinophilic Granuloma Complex - Mar Vista Animal Medical Center

Very helpful. His belly looks bad in the photo but before I moved it was much worse so I'm hoping he can heal.

Any food recommendations? Maybe tiki cat? Or a cheaper option?

For wet food I like to give him brothy type food as thats his favorite. Any pate or huge chunks and he won't eat it. Ideally I'd like to give him the same brand of wet and dry food. Like I said he has refused nulo and iams but I never tried starving him out. Always mixed it with the cat chow and hed spit out what isn't cat chow
 

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weili

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Your situation is just scaring me. It sounds like he is really unhealthy. And letting him eat cheap is an absolute no. Frailer cats are more suceptible to stress causing their health to go bad. A lot of purebred ragdolls from catteries that don't spend much time with them or much affection, the fur because rough and get tangled easily. This is due to health concern. Cats love affection. So no affection their fur becomes rough. Mine came with rough fur and after several days or massaging him and letting him enjoy his life, his fur is getting better now.

Several reasons cats can get sick, not enough exercise, bad food no nutrients. I always read the ingredients on my cats food. Because cats are more sensitive than humans when is comes to toxic ingredients. Can you believe they put ingredients that have been proven to cause cell damage in animals. And there were reports about that specific food brand causing seizures in cats. My baby will never experience something like that, because I look up the ingredients. Avoid anything that say dioxide. Avoid using chemical cleaners. Start using seventh generation or a eco brand. You need to remove any contact of possible toxic chemicals. So he can start recovering and get him more exercise. Find a toy he can go crazy over. I build my cat with muscles so I don't have to worry about him. And he uses those muscles 24/7 stomps on the floor and runs around the house we assumed there was a horse race. We use to panic everytime we heard a random loud noise. Now we don't even react, because we assume its him. Give him massages or make him be able relax, avoid using harmful chemicals to make him relax. You can use catnip or something that doesn't cause harm. Also get rid of dust in the air (air purifier) and around the house. And start feeding him fresh food, like meat and mix vegtables. Don't buy vegatable from winco or costco. Their vegatablea usually don't have any nutrients, since the cheap out on buying fertlizer. Do this for a year or two. He should be fine. I don't feel safe listening to a vet telling to remove something scary off my baby without telling me the reason. Otherwise suspicious. People are so funny don't know the reason why costco food is cheaper. Can you believe the a package of eggs at costco is 2 dollars less just because they are treating the chicken not like a living thing. It is so saddening the living conditions. I wish US would stop saying animals don't feel pain as an excuse to do this kind of abuse. And start making it illegal. The situation is horrifying. Which is why I only have sympathy for animals and not for humans. I only feel sympathy to the helpless.
 
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Sonicthemeow

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Your situation is just scaring me. It sounds like he is really unhealthy. And letting him eat cheap is an absolute no. Frailer cats are more suceptible to stress causing their health to go bad. A lot of purebred ragdolls from catteries that don't spend much time with them or much affection, the fur because rough and get tangled easily. This is due to health concern. Cats love affection. So no affection their fur becomes rough. Mine came with rough fur and after several days or massaging him and letting him enjoy his life, his fur is getting better now.

Several reasons cats can get sick, not enough exercise, bad food no nutrients. I always read the ingredients on my cats food. Because cats are more sensitive than humans when is comes to toxic ingredients. Can you believe they put ingredients that have been proven to cause cell damage in animals. And there were reports about that specific food brand causing seizures in cats. My baby will never experience something like that, because I look up the ingredients. Avoid anything that say dioxide. Avoid using chemical cleaners. Start using seventh generation or a eco brand. You need to remove any contact of possible toxic chemicals. So he can start recovering and get him more exercise. Find a toy he can go crazy over. I build my cat with muscles so I don't have to worry about him. And he uses those muscles 24/7 stomps on the floor and runs around the house we assumed there was a horse race. We use to panic everytime we heard a random loud noise. Now we don't even react, because we assume its him. Give him massages or make him be able relax, avoid using harmful chemicals to make him relax. You can use catnip or something that doesn't cause harm. Also get rid of dust in the air (air purifier) and around the house. And start feeding him fresh food, like meat and mix vegtables. Don't buy vegatable from winco or costco. Their vegatablea usually don't have any nutrients, since the cheap out on buying fertlizer. Do this for a year or two. He should be fine. I don't feel safe listening to a vet telling to remove something scary off my baby without telling me the reason. Otherwise suspicious. People are so funny don't know the reason why costco food is cheaper. Can you believe the a package of eggs at costco is 2 dollars less just because they are treating the chicken not like a living thing. It is so saddening the living conditions. I wish US would stop saying animals don't feel pain as an excuse to do this kind of abuse. And start making it illegal. The situation is horrifying. Which is why I only have sympathy for animals and not for humans. I only feel sympathy to the helpless.
I have spent thousands on my cat. I got him to help me from ending my life. His health is important to me. Moving was a factor for him too. I changed my whole life to move to somewhere with a cooler climate.

He has a glimmer in his eyes. He is funny. He runs around. He urinates and poos normally.

Is this really horrifying?
 
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Sonicthemeow

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But guys, I'm really trying here. Money is not an issue. You know how hard it is to get into a good vet right now. I moved across the country with a cat hospital across the street just for him. I've been to the vet so stinking much. They never give answers. Just endless antibiotics and steroids. I also work in vaccine engineering so you can imagine how stressful the last 3 years have been for me. But I do everything for him 😢

He is not acting lethargic.

Any non judgmental tips are very welcome. He was 16lbs when I got him. Food recommendations most welcome
 
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Hi. I hope your new vet will be more helpful with his poor stomach sore. Is it itchy and/or sore to him? You could try chamomile tea to help with that until you see the vet. Buy chamomile tea bags - you can find them in most any grocery store and generally speaking those are German - you don't want English or any flavorings or additives. Brew a bag in water, cool the liquid to room temp and then dab some on that place with cotton balls or a soft cloth - 2-3 times a day. Chamomile tea, which is a soothing and healing agent, also has anti-bacterial/anti-fungal properties. It is safe for your cat to ingest should he do so.

As far as foods, is there a particular reason you want to change? Because of his weight, or ? Canned food is generally better than dry food anyway, not only from a moisture standpoint but also because it is usually less in calories.
 

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feline-eosinophilic-granuloma-complex-in-cats | VCA Animal Hospital

Rodent ulcers can appear on any part of a cat's body, although the face is more likely. The above article is very similar to the one that you found earlier.

Have you seen the new vet yet? I was not entirely clear on the time frame. Remember that all records from the previous vet, if you don't have them in your possession, have to be forwarded to the new vet upon request. It will be helpful if the new vet can see what has been done and what has or has not worked.

If things are a little better in your new home, allergies can be suspected. If it is a food allergy, avoid chicken for starters.
11 Key Facts About Food Allergies In Cats – TheCatSite Articles
Determining food allergies, can be a long road, but it can be worked out.

If the new vet seems unable to solve this, (not suggesting that he is not competent as a general practice vet) ask for a referral to a specialist in dermatology or even internal medicine, depending on what is available in your new area. Often it is less expensive and quicker to resolve with a specialist who sees similar conditions on a regular basis.
 
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Sonicthemeow

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Hi. I hope your new vet will be more helpful with his poor stomach sore. Is it itchy and/or sore to him? You could try chamomile tea to help with that until you see the vet. Buy chamomile tea bags - you can find them in most any grocery store and generally speaking those are German - you don't want English or any flavorings or additives. Brew a bag in water, cool the liquid to room temp and then dab some on that place with cotton balls or a soft cloth - 2-3 times a day. Chamomile tea, which is a soothing and healing agent, also has anti-bacterial/anti-fungal properties. It is safe for your cat to ingest should he do so.

As far as foods, is there a particular reason you want to change? Because of his weight, or ? Canned food is generally better than dry food anyway, not only from a moisture standpoint but also because it is usually less in calories.
Thank you for that tip! Does not seem itchy or sore. He rolls around and lays on his stomach. He lets me brush and touch him around that area.

I wanted to change because it seems cheap.
Unbiased Purina Cat Chow Review In 2022 - All About Cats

Is this site pretty legitimate?

I thought it could possibly attribute to his condition. I changed water bowls, litter, no more plastics etc. Thought food should be one of them.

I also have no idea how to feed him. Growing up we always kept the cat bowl always filled so I never questioned it until I lived with a roommate who had a feeding time. So I'm looking into when to feed wet and dry food and how much

Should I be worried about his weight? Is 16lbs too much? He was that weight when I adopted him so I also never questioned it. He does seem constipated at times but I thought it may be because of his bobtail. Sometimes I'll find a stray poo on the floor I'm guessing a dingleberry that fell
 
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Sonicthemeow

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feline-eosinophilic-granuloma-complex-in-cats | VCA Animal Hospital

Rodent ulcers can appear on any part of a cat's body, although the face is more likely. The above article is very similar to the one that you found earlier.

Have you seen the new vet yet? I was not entirely clear on the time frame. Remember that all records from the previous vet, if you don't have them in your possession, have to be forwarded to the new vet upon request. It will be helpful if the new vet can see what has been done and what has or has not worked.

If things are a little better in your new home, allergies can be suspected. If it is a food allergy, avoid chicken for starters.
11 Key Facts About Food Allergies In Cats – TheCatSite Articles
Determining food allergies, can be a long road, but it can be worked out.

If the new vet seems unable to solve this, (not suggesting that he is not competent as a general practice vet) ask for a referral to a specialist in dermatology or even internal medicine, depending on what is available in your new area. Often it is less expensive and quicker to resolve with a specialist who sees similar conditions on a regular basis.
Thank you for the links! Seeing the new vet on the 1st

His skin and fur does seem better as a whole after moving. I lived in a swamp forest cabin and I think he was eating the lizards and spiders. It was such a pest area. Absolutely beautiful but we got snakes, frogs, bats, birds inside from time to time

I will for sure do that this time around. I don't want endless vet visits again

Tiki cat has some good reviews so I'm considering that. I think a lot of it has chicken though
 

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I’m not sure where you got the information that wet fish products are better for skin and coat. It’s actually a bit of a grey area, because it’s about quality. There have been concerns with high levels of mercury in some fish products, so you might want to investigate the quality and type of fish in the food.

Also, as has been mentioned, wet foods are generally considered better than dry. Think of cats as having developed as wholly carnivorous desert creatures who get most of their water from their prey. Their natural inclination is not to actually drink a lot of water. So a diet of dry food will lead to chronic dehydration. This is why you will see lots of conversations on how people get their cats to drink more.

Another thing you might consider is adding a little egg yolk to the wet food. It has good fats and vit. B to help with skin and coat. It will also help with hairballs. You don’t need to use an entire yolk all at once, between a teaspoon and tablespoon per meal should be enough. You can keep extra yolk in the fridge. I‘ve found that adding a few drops of water seems to help it keep for an extra day or two.

Hopefully your new vet can be more helpful about that growth. Maybe get a biopsy, at the very least.
 
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Sonicthemeow

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I’m not sure where you got the information that wet fish products are better for skin and coat. It’s actually a bit of a grey area, because it’s about quality. There have been concerns with high levels of mercury in some fish products, so you might want to investigate the quality and type of fish in the food.

Also, as has been mentioned, wet foods are generally considered better than dry. Think of cats as having developed as wholly carnivorous desert creatures who get most of their water from their prey. Their natural inclination is not to actually drink a lot of water. So a diet of dry food will lead to chronic dehydration. This is why you will see lots of conversations on how people get their cats to drink more.

Another thing you might consider is adding a little egg yolk to the wet food. It has good fats and vit. B to help with skin and coat. It will also help with hairballs. You don’t need to use an entire yolk all at once, between a teaspoon and tablespoon per meal should be enough. You can keep extra yolk in the fridge. I‘ve found that adding a few drops of water seems to help it keep for an extra day or two.

Hopefully your new vet can be more helpful about that growth. Maybe get a biopsy, at the very least.
Thank you for the tips! I think I read that on an article relating to rodent ulcers. I can remember if it was the amino acids or fats of the fish

This has all been really helpful c:
 

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I tend to like most of the information I have seen on the All About Cat's web site.

I am not saying he is overweight, as I would have no idea, I just thought that was where you were going with wanting a food change. If you are thinking of doing so based on the belly sore, I am not sure you should necessarily go there before you get to have this new vet take a look at it. A food allergy, IMO, seems unlikely as I think he would have more issues skin-wise than just one location.

It doesn't hurt to try other foods - your best bet is to find a local pet store where you can buy single cans and try them out, instead of bulk buying.

Btw, a skin scraping of that spot for testing/analysis would be less invasive than a biopsy, in case the new vet would suggest either. I would get basic workups done with a new vet - blood work, urinalysis, analysis of that spot, and see what comes of that before you keep trying to change a bunch of other things.
 

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Sixteen pounds is relative to his overall size, or dependent on what his ideal weight should be. I have an orange boy who is 17 pounds and not overweight....he is a long, heavy cat who requires two arms to hold. Is your cat a particular breed or known mix? In his pic, his midsection looks a little bit heavy, but that might be the angle. Do you think that he seems overweight?

The reviews of Purina are ones that would probably be generally accepted for any lower priced cat (or dog) food. Using the same site, you probably found that their review of Tiki was much higher. Using a wet cat food would be a good idea for reasons mentioned in the previous post. While you may be dealing with a food allergy, which gives some limitations, it would also be preferable if he did not eat a largely fish diet.

The constipation may be a side issue to the dry diet; discuss it with the vet. There are remedies for constipation, like the egg yolk or the use of Miralax, but I would not introduce a product like that until you see what the vet says. It may resolve itself with a change in food.
 

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Btw, a skin scraping of that spot for testing/analysis would be less invasive than a biopsy, in case the new vet would suggest either. I would get basic workups done with a new vet - blood work, urinalysis, analysis of that spot, and see what comes of that before you keep trying to change a bunch of other things.
Fair point. 👍
 

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Hi, have you seen the new vet yet? What did he/she say?

I have a definite suspicion of what I think that strange spot/area is on his belly but I don't want to say it, because it would be bad and I hope it's not what he has. So I don't want to scare you unnecessarily before hearing what the vet said.
It doesn't look like a rodent ulcer to me, or related to allergies.

I can help with the constipation problem. Both my cats are prone to hairballs and constipation and I finally found a remedy. I add a very small amount of ground psyllium husk to their wet food with each meal. Mix it in really well and they don't even notice it's there. Just a very small amount because too much will cause diarrhea. My cats have never been so "regular" and I can tell they feel better, too. And since the bowels are moving normally now, the hair that would have formed hairballs is passing through the digestive tract like it's supposed to.

As for his weight, 16 lbs could be great or it could be obese. It depends on his build/size. Just ask the vet and he/she will tell you if he's a good weight or not. I can't tell without seeing a photo of his whole body. edited: I just saw your comment with a photo of him lying on the bed and it does look like he could lose a little weight, but he's not too bad. It's hard to tell from that angle in that photo, though.

As for a food recommendation, my two LOVE the brand "I-and-Love-and-You". I feed them the "whascally wabbit" pate canned food.

Please update us so we can know how he is doing and what that spot is around his nipple. I hope it is not what I think it is....fingers crossed he's OK.
 
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Sonicthemeow

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Hi, have you seen the new vet yet? What did he/she say?

I have a definite suspicion of what I think that strange spot/area is on his belly but I don't want to say it, because it would be bad and I hope it's not what he has. So I don't want to scare you unnecessarily before hearing what the vet said.
It doesn't look like a rodent ulcer to me, or related to allergies.

I can help with the constipation problem. Both my cats are prone to hairballs and constipation and I finally found a remedy. I add a very small amount of psyllium powder to their wet food with each meal. Mix it in really well and they don't even notice it's there. Just a very small amount because too much will cause diarrhea. My cats have never been so "regular" and I can tell they feel better, too. And since the bowels are moving normally now, the hair that would have formed hairballs is passing through the digestive tract like it's supposed to.

As for his weight, 16 lbs could be great or it could be obese. It depends on his build/size. Just ask the vet and he/she will tell you if he's a good weight or not. I can't tell without seeing a photo of his whole body. edited: I just saw your comment with a photo of him lying on the bed and it does look like he could lose a little weight, but he's not too bad. It's hard to tell from that angle in that photo, though.

As for a food recommendation, my two LOVE the brand "I-and-Love-and-You". I feed them the "whascally wabbit" pate canned food.

Please update us so we can know how he is doing and what that spot is around his nipple. I hope it is not what I think it is....fingers crossed he's OK.
Thank you for the response! He said he wasn't sure and the vet who knows more has an appointment with him coming up as he needed a dental as well.

He likes the tiki cat food so thats what I've been giving to him. The vet said his weight was fine for his build. Depending on how his vet visit goes I may take him somewhere else if they can't figure it out

Id love to know your suspicion as the vet didn't seem to have any idea ö
 

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Thank you for the response! He said he wasn't sure and the vet who knows more has an appointment with him coming up as he needed a dental as well.

He likes the tiki cat food so thats what I've been giving to him. The vet said his weight was fine for his build. Depending on how his vet visit goes I may take him somewhere else if they can't figure it out

Id love to know your suspicion as the vet didn't seem to have any idea ö
Hmmm. That's strange that the vet didn't even have a guess as to what that spot was. Well, I really didn't want to be the one to bring it up, but it looks like skin cancer to me from that photo. But I think you mentioned that it had been worse and was getting better, so that makes me think it is something else. But I have heard of cancers spontaneously improving and sometimes going away on their own, so it is still possible. Again, I hope that is not what it is. But from the uneven borders, the multiple colors and the size and location right around the nipple...it just makes me think cancer. But I'm not a vet or a doctor, I just have a degree in biology. I'm really going off of what I have heard about human skin cancer and those advisories about "when to see a doctor about a mole", that sort of thing. It is also a little difficult for me to tell just from one single photo. But, that was my immediate suspicion. If it seems more like a rash in that it comes and goes and shows up in different places, then I would say it is not cancer. But I can't tell from one photo.

Also wanted to add that I should have written "ground psyllium husk" instead of "psyllium powder". Just to be clear. (I'll edit the original comment)
 

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Hi. So sorry, didn't read all the replies. Just the first one. If this is already said, I apologize.
First off, I want to say that your cat looks very happy and healthy. No need to feel you aren't taking care of him. You are.

Couple of things to mention though. I know you said that you don't force him to eat what you want him to by not offering the food he likes. You said you mix it and that is great. But I feel I would be negligent if I didn't tell you that you should never let a cat go more than 24 hours without eating. Cats get something called hepatic lipidosis when they suddenly, and sometimes not all that suddenly, stop eating. I have seen them get it from even a reduction in food consumed. Heavier cats are at more risk, but I have seen cats of all sizes get it. It is a life-threatening disease that requires hospitalization and a feeding tube.

Eosinophilic Granuloma Complex (ECG) is a not well understood disease that can be multi-faceted. There is the rodent ulcers that cats will get on their lip ranging from mild to disfiguring, there is also the eosinophilic plaques that they can get on their skin. I have seen them look much like your cats, but it is rare.
I am not saying that is what it is, but he does have a history of the rodent ulcers, so it could be. The thought on ECG now is that it is caused by an allergic response to often insects, food, pollen etc.

What I would do for starters, if he were my cat, would be as follows:

Start a prescription hypoallergenic canned diet with either a novel protein source or hydrogenated protein. Feed that and only that for at least 45 days to see if there is improvement. I would cut out all supplements or anything else fed.

I would make sure all his dishes were either stainless steel or porcelain and wash them daily. I would also make sure the food was fed on a flat plate as opposed to a bowl.

I would go over him with a flea comb and wash his bedding weekly in hot water and unscented laundry soap.

I would use a product (Revolution) the original, not the Revolution Plus. I would use it monthly even if I didn't ever see a flea.

I would use caution with anything scented.

I would only use a dust free perfume free cat litter and make sure the litter box doesn't have a top on it. Even the dust free has dust, and the top will mean he is breathing more of it.

I would get an appointment with a board-certified veterinary dermatologist asap, as I think that you will waste so much money on regular veterinary visits and they aren't figuring it out. I would be very careful with any vaccines or anything that might upset the immune system, for now. I would also want to know what that is on the belly before having a dental done.

I would definitely be looking to see if there are any lesions in his mouth along his gums or down his throat. The version of this that affect the inside of the cat's mouth is bad. Fortunately, it is not often seen.

The above is just what I would do. Only suggestions.

He looks to be a lovely cat. Is he your only cat?

Below are some links regarding ECG complex
Eosinophilic Granuloma Complex | International Cat Care (icatcare.org)
Eosinophilic Granuloma Complex | Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine
 

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With cats the most common skin cancer is squamous cell carcinoma and it is often on the face, ears, nose. There is also cutaneous lymphoma that is rare but doesn’t look anything like this.
 
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