All Thing Books And Reading Thread 2021

misty8723

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Going to start a new Book: Her Last Flight by Beatriz Williams

Takes place in 1947, with a photographer and war correspondent; investigating the disappearance of an aviation pioneer, during the Spanish Civil War. She finds his last student, an protege; currently living in Hawaii. While trying to re-visit his last flight in 1937, she discovered bits and pieces of the student/protege's incredible life...
This sounded interesting, so I looked at it on Amazon. $12 for the Kindle edition is way more than I can afford. Have you read it? Was it any good?

I read a lot of WWII themed books, love the history.
 

Tobermory

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Quite by accident, I read two books in a row where the main character, a woman, is a bibliophile: The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel and The Lost and Found Bookshop by Susan Wiggs. The first is set in France during WWII and is the story of a woman using her skills as a forger to help Jews escape the Nazis. I’m going to check out more by this author. The second is about a young woman who suffers a tragedy and struggles to get past it (and meet a guy). Well written and I liked a couple of the characters—the grandfather and a little girl—but not typically the kind of book I go for.
 

Mamanyt1953

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I'm now on #7 of the Newford books, "Forests of the Heart." I can't decide if I like the collections of short stories or the novels better in this series books. I like them both VERY well, indeed!
 

rubysmama

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I'm currently reading "Her Dark Lies" by J. T. Ellison. It's a quick, fast read, and keeping me wondering what's going on, and who's behind it.

Once I finish that, I'll be reading Frankenstein, our September book of the month.

I just finished Kate Quinn’s The Huntress. Powerful. Her books are full of strong women, noble ones and evil ones both.
Not sure if I've read anything by her or not, but they sound like something I'd like.

Quite by accident, I read two books in a row where the main character, a woman, is a bibliophile: The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel and The Lost and Found Bookshop by Susan Wiggs. The first is set in France during WWII and is the story of a woman using her skills as a forger to help Jews escape the Nazis. I’m going to check out more by this author. The second is about a young woman who suffers a tragedy and struggles to get past it (and meet a guy). Well written and I liked a couple of the characters—the grandfather and a little girl—but not typically the kind of book I go for.
I haven't read either of those, but I think I have "The Lost and Found Bookshop" on my wishlist at the library. Good to know it's an enjoyable read.

I'm now on #7 of the Newford books, "Forests of the Heart." I can't decide if I like the collections of short stories or the novels better in this series books. I like them both VERY well, indeed!
Not familiar with that series. Is is one of your cozy mystery ones?
 

Mamanyt1953

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Not familiar with that series. Is is one of your cozy mystery ones?
Oh, no...far from it. Charles de Lint writes urban faerie tales (as opposed to "fairy tales"), and he is a master of them. His stories are filled with magical beings that you simply MUST believe in, if only for the duration of the books themselves. I began reading him long, long ago. Newford is an imaginary city, and I'd pack up and move there in a heartbeat. There are some 20 books in the Newford series, several trilogies, and a body of books unrelated to Newford, but still magical, some 20-strong.
 

rubysmama

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Oh, no...far from it. Charles de Lint writes urban faerie tales (as opposed to "fairy tales"), and he is a master of them. His stories are filled with magical beings that you simply MUST believe in, if only for the duration of the books themselves. I began reading him long, long ago. Newford is an imaginary city, and I'd pack up and move there in a heartbeat. There are some 20 books in the Newford series, several trilogies, and a body of books unrelated to Newford, but still magical, some 20-strong.
Oh, ok. Definitely not cozy mysteries. :lol:

I finished "Her Dark Lies", and was a bit disappointed in the ending. But it was a quick read.

Now starting Frankenstein. I've read it before, but already forgot how it started. So, almost, like reading it for the first time. :)

And sometime in the next couple of weeks, or so, I have to decide what I'm going to read for our October book of the month anniversary celebration twist. Hope everyone who posts here is planning to participate, as it will be fun to see if we're introduced to new books and authors.

In case anyone missed the thread when it was posted, here's the link: October 2021 book of the month club - 2 year anniversary celebration

And the September one, as well. September 2021 book of the month club (Poll)
 

Mamanyt1953

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I'm now reading "The Onion GIrl," #8 in the Newford series. REALLY enjoying this one, as it is a detailed story of one of my favorite characters in the Newford series.
 

rubysmama

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OH OH OH! "Go and Tell the Bees That I am Gone" by Diana Gabaldon will be out on November 23!!!
Looking forward to its release, and hoping I happen upon it soon after the e-book version gets added to my library, or I'll likely be waiting a LONG time for it.

Winchester Winchester : I remember you're a big fan of the books, so I'm guessing you're excited about it finally being released. :)
 

Mamanyt1953

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I'm now re-reading "Widdershins," which I read for the first time last month. HOWEVER, I do want to read all of the Newford books pretty much in order, so here I go again.
 

PMousse

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I just finished Kate Quinn’s The Huntress. Powerful. Her books are full of strong women, noble ones and evil ones both.
Have you read her The Alice Network? Also really amazing featuring strong women and inspired by true events (WWII spy network run by women!). Ever since reading that book I've wanted to read her other books, but alas there are always too many books to read and too little time.

Quite by accident, I read two books in a row where the main character, a woman, is a bibliophile: The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel and The Lost and Found Bookshop by Susan Wiggs. The first is set in France during WWII and is the story of a woman using her skills as a forger to help Jews escape the Nazis. I’m going to check out more by this author. The second is about a young woman who suffers a tragedy and struggles to get past it (and meet a guy). Well written and I liked a couple of the characters—the grandfather and a little girl—but not typically the kind of book I go for.
I'm currently reading Kate Morton's The Distant Hours, and guess what?! The protagonist is a woman and a bibliophile!
 

Tobermory

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Have you read her The Alice Network? Also really amazing featuring strong women and inspired by true events (WWII spy network run by women!). Ever since reading that book I've wanted to read her other books, but alas there are always too many books to read and too little time.
Yes! And I liked that one, too. The Rose Code is another of hers set in WWII, also really good. But I tried to read one of hers set during the French Revolution (the Marie Antoinette period), and it just didn't click for me.
I'm currently reading Kate Morton's The Distant Hours, and guess what?! The protagonist is a woman and a bibliophile!
Ooo. Another for my list! Thanks!
 

artiemom

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Have you read her The Alice Network? Also really amazing featuring strong women and inspired by true events (WWII spy network run by women!). Ever since reading that book I've wanted to read her other books, but alas there are always too many books to read and too little time.

I'm currently reading Kate Morton's The Distant Hours, and guess what?! The protagonist is a woman and a bibliophile!
Quite by accident, I read two books in a row where the main character, a woman, is a bibliophile: The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel and The Lost and Found Bookshop by Susan Wiggs. The first is set in France during WWII and is the story of a woman using her skills as a forger to help Jews escape the Nazis. I’m going to check out more by this author. The second is about a young woman who suffers a tragedy and struggles to get past it (and meet a guy). Well written and I liked a couple of the characters—the grandfather and a little girl—but not typically the kind of book I go for.
These books sound so interesting. I am kind of taken with WWII stories.

Yes, I am now reading: Her Last Flight. It does jump around a bit.. From the 1930's, to post WWII
Kind of interesting, and an easy read. Once I start reading, I do not want to stop, until my eyes get a bit tired. It is a good book to read while you are sitting outside.
 
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