Adopting a kitten who has URI - another cat in household.

Meowchelle1992

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Hi there,

I applied to adopt a kitten who was born into a foster’s home with the hopes of it being disease free. She was brought to me yesterday with what has been diagnosed as an upper respiratory infection. I’ve kept her separate from my other cat, but I’m truly very concerned of my cat contracting this from her either no or in the future. If it’s feline herpes, she will have the virus for life and can end up being infective again.
My cat is 3 years old and is so bad at the bet he has to be sedated for anything more than a shot (through the carrier.) my concern is if he gets sick, he will be a terrible patient and hard to treat.
Has anyone experienced adopting a second cat with a URI or other disease?
 

fionasmom

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Yes, and you are right to be concerned. A few years ago I rescued a kitten whom I still own as an adult cat. She clearly had a URI so I isolated her outside in a huge dog crate, took her to the vet and treated her, and had her cleared by the vet after the treatment. It all took about two weeks. However, when I brought her in the house, my other cats got the URI. They were all treated and recovered, but it was not a great time for any of us. It is possible that, while I tried to be very careful with her, that I might have carried some of the infection into the house myself.

Absolutely isolate her and get her to a vet for treatment. I am not clear on the relationship to the foster. What did they say when they handed you a kitten with a URI? Is she being treated? They took her to a vet? We realize that she has this, but it is up to you to treat her? I am in no way encouraging you to turn your back on this kitten or not keep her, but I would get her to a vet for treatment and their advice as to how to proceed with keeping your other cat safe.
 
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Meowchelle1992

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Yes, and you are right to be concerned. A few years ago I rescued a kitten whom I still own as an adult cat. She clearly had a URI so I isolated her outside in a huge dog crate, took her to the vet and treated her, and had her cleared by the vet after the treatment. It all took about two weeks. However, when I brought her in the house, my other cats got the URI. They were all treated and recovered, but it was not a great time for any of us. It is possible that, while I tried to be very careful with her, that I might have carried some of the infection into the house myself.

Absolutely isolate her and get her to a vet for treatment. I am not clear on the relationship to the foster. What did they say when they handed you a kitten with a URI? Is she being treated? They took her to a vet? We realize that she has this, but it is up to you to treat her? I am in no way encouraging you to turn your back on this kitten or not keep her, but I would get her to a vet for treatment and their advice as to how to proceed with keeping your other cat safe.
I asked her foster about her sneezing and she said she didn’t sneeze consistently. So she wasn’t aware it was an URI. I took the kitten to the vet today for treatment options and we are just slightly overwhelmed at the possibility of this being a lifelong thing. We feel so torn because obviously the kitten deserves a chance but we are trying to figure out what’s best for our cat
 

fionasmom

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Is your other cat vaccinated against herpes? As you know, it may not guarantee that there will never be an issue, but in a vaccinated cat it should be much less. What did the vet say?
 
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Meowchelle1992

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He is vaccinated but they said it minimizes symptoms of the feline herpes virus but isn’t totally effective against them getting it. The vet says knowing how bad of a patient he is at the vet, they wouldn’t necessarily recommend adopting a cat with herpes unless I can be sure to separate the kitten if she gets sick again
 
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