A Cat Called Chicken.

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Norachan

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Thank you lavishsqualor lavishsqualor I know what great lengths you go to for the cats in your care, so it means a lot to hear you think I'm a good custodian.

:hugs:

That's a very moving quote. She was a big part of my life. Sometimes the ones who are only here for a few years have such a profound impact, the prints they leave on us last far longer than their lives here on Earth lasted.

I know I'll never forget her. Hugs to you and all of your cats.

:catlove:
 

catapault

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Norachan Norachan There is a bulb called naked lady, because it flowers in early September, before the leaves appear the following spring. Looks like a huge lavender crocus. August is the time to plant them. They can grow among hosta. They are more expensive than a crocus but not terribly so, and multiply nicely. Look for Colchicum speciousum or C. autumnale. I think the surprise flowers in September will remind you that Chicken is still around, playing, now, hide and seek with you.

Just found this so editing to add: "From Hiroko: Japanese name of Colchicum is イヌ – サフラン (inu-safuran). Safuran is transliteration for Saffron. There is no Japanese name in Chinese character for it since it is only phonetically translated. Inu is dog in Japanese, and it is often used as a prefix to describe for something similar but of lesser quality and useless. Therefore, Colchicum looks alike Saffron, but it is useless not like Saffron. "
 

lavishsqualor

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Norachan Norachan There is a bulb called naked lady, because it flowers in early September, before the leaves appear the following spring. Looks like a huge lavender crocus. August is the time to plant them. They can grow among hosta. They are more expensive than a crocus but not terribly so, and multiply nicely. Look for Colchicum speciousum or C. autumnale. I think the surprise flowers in September will remind you that Chicken is still around, playing, now, hide and seek with you.
Those flowers are beautiful and they do indeed resemble crocus. How interesting that they have no foliage. And you're absolutely right about Norachan's variegated hostas being a fantastic backdrop for them.
 

catapault

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Exactly! lavishsqualor lavishsqualor You have nailed the issue with common names. One plant may have several different common names. Or the same common name may be used for several different plants.

Lycoris squamigera may be known as resurrection lily OR surprise lily OR magic lily OR naked ladies.

Naked lady has been used for the lycoris AND colchicum AND yet another bulb, Amaryllis belladonna Which, BTW, has nothing to do with the bulbs sold around Christmas time that are called amaryllis, as a common name. Which have the Latin name of Hippeastrum

Norachan Norachan so sorry for hijacking your thread about Chicken cat. I had thought to suggest a lovely, easy care bulb for you to plant, now, that would enhance her memorial garden. Then became led astray down a detour on the garden path.
 
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Norachan

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I had thought to suggest a lovely, easy care bulb for you to plant, now, that would enhance her memorial garden. Then became led astray down a detour on the garden path.
That's OK, it's easily done. I'm getting more and more obsessed by plants as time goes by.

:)

You've given me some ideas though. I Googled all the flowers you suggested and I think I might try planting some Lycoris radiata, or red spider lilies. It seems that the bulbs are poisonous if eaten, but not the flowers, so they should be OK to plant in the enclosure. I've seen some growing in other gardens around here, so I think they'll survive at this altitude.

I've seen a lot of Resurrection lilies growing in gardens further down the mountain. Are they very tough in cold weather? Our winters are pretty harsh.

Thank you for all of your suggestions. I think a garden that changes every season will be a nice way to remember Chicken.

:heartshape:
 

catapault

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Norachan Norachan If your mention of resurrection lily (lovely name to associate with Chicken) refers to Lycoris squamigera then yes, I think it should be hardy for you. That's because it is winter dormant, no leaves to be damaged by winter cold. The tricky part is that the bulbs do not like to be disturbed. Best time to plant if you are getting them from a friend's garden is when the leaves wither at the end of their growing season. If you are buying commercial bulbs, well, you'll plant them whenever the vendors supply them. They probably will grow their leaves but won't flower the first year, while they are settling into the new site.

Another plant with an odd growing cycle is lords and ladies, Arum italicum 'Pictum' Another shade tolerant plant, it has silver veined arrowhead shaped leaves - in winter! Flowers in spring with green sort of Jack-in-the-pulpit like flower, and a cluster of red berries in summer, again sort of like those on Jack-in-the-pulpit. Nice in combination with hosta since it has leaves when the hosta do not.

Winter Green_2008-12_Arum italicum 'Pictum'.jpg BelleWood in Bloom_2014-08_Arum italicum Pictum-seeds closeup.jpg
Images show leaves, in January, seed cluster in August
 
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